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Some references needed

  1. Nov 5, 2003 #1
    hello all. i am new to this forum and i would like some references about quantum physics. i know basic few principles and postulates and some stuff about qt. electrodynamics, but i would like to expand my knowledge.

    i use arxiv.org for all my physics research, but most of the things regarding quantum physics are technical expansions of older theories, and i dont know older theories for all other aspects of physics i am very good at newtonian mechanics, i graduated electrodynamics on high-school level and on university level, and i am currently working on projects regarding particle dynamics. no, this is not bragging, i just want to say that i consider to know my way around physics, and i feel i need to expand my knowlege onto quantum levels.

    if anyone has any advice regarding where i could find ebooks or tutorials on the Internet, help is highly appreciated. i know beyond those "introducion to quantum world sites", so dont post them

    thank you in advance.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 5, 2003 #2

    chroot

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    Welcome to the forum, zare.

    I'm not really sure you're going to find what you want online -- I know I've never run across anything on the web that competes with a decent textbook.

    So, what you want is a decent textbook. I recommend Griffiths' "Introduction to Quantum Mechanics." Your school's library almost certainly has a copy (or ten) if you don't feel like buying a $100 textbook.

    - Warren
     
  4. Nov 5, 2003 #3
    Griffiths is a good book for introductory QM. It's written in an easy to understand way, and Griffiths has a casual style. I refer to it often, even in my graduate quantum courses.
     
  5. Nov 5, 2003 #4

    chroot

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    I like it for all the same reasons -- it's very readable, and very good for self-study.

    - Warren
     
  6. Nov 5, 2003 #5

    selfAdjoint

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    May I suggest the online course in non relativistic quantum mechanics that is currently being given? It is tutored by Patrick Van Esch, a professional physicst. They are working their way through Sakurai's first four chapters, which would be a good introduction for you. The course is free, but you have to buy the textbook. They are currently (and for another week or so) stil on chapter 1.

    To sign up, or just investigate, go to www.superstringtheory.com and you will find a banner across the homepage about signing up. Click on it and it willl take you to a page that explains the parameters of the course and instructs on further steps to sign up
     
  7. Nov 5, 2003 #6
    I've never cared for Griffiths' QM book (the only one of his books about which I can say that). Its main failing is a lack of treatment of QM from the perspective of Dirac bra-kets. I know some people find them abstract, but personally I never really understood what QM was all about until I saw it from that perspective, and I don't think it's too hard for beginners; a lot of things actually become more intuitive, in my opinion. (Feynman goes quite far with them; I wouldn't recommend his lectures as a first introduction, though; good on concepts, not enough problem-solving.)

    For that reason, I prefer books like Liboff, Shankar, etc. as an introduction to QM.
     
  8. Nov 5, 2003 #7

    chroot

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    I have Liboff as well, and it's not bad -- it's just not nearly as easy to read or inviting as Griffiths.

    - Warren
     
  9. Nov 5, 2003 #8
    Griffiths has a very friendly and colloquial style, I'll give you that. But it has seemed to me that Griffiths-trained students tend to have slightly less grasp of the foundations of the theory as those trained from other books. On the other hand, they're pretty good at problem-solving.
     
  10. Nov 6, 2003 #9
    thank you all. i see that most of you agreed on Griffit's book. i've checked out and my university library has it. i also found some pdf-s (around 80) pages on quantum mechanics, regarding waves and particles, construction and application of schrodinger equation, operators and hilbert space. i feel that it'll do for start.

    if anyone is interested, i have lots of pdf's on electrodynamics, particle acceleration, electric propulsion systems, lasers...and tons regarding computer sciences, like ebooks from microsoft press, sybex...plus dozens more on programming and unix based operating systems. i'd be happy to share it with you.
     
  11. Nov 6, 2003 #10

    jcsd

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    If you don't want to break the bank on a textbook then Alastair Rae's Quantum Mechanics published by the IoP or the Schaum's Outline series book on quantum mecahnics are both pretty cheap and geared towards the novice.
     
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