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Specific heat capacity (the very basics)

  1. Sep 2, 2015 #1
    The specific heat capacity is the amount of heat energy
    needed to raise 1 kg of a substance by 1 °C.


    Q. So the specific heat capacity of water is 4.184kJ (given that 1 Cal (large calorie aka the kg calorie aka the food calorie) is required to do the same, ie, raise the temperature of 1 kg of water by 1 degree C and 1 Cal is equivalent to 4.184kJ?

    Q. 1 cal (small calorie aka gramme calorie) is the amount of heat energy required to raise the temperature of 1g of water by 1 degree C, yes? 1 cal = 4.184J.

    Q. 1 Cal = 1000 cal? 1 Cal = 1kcal?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 2, 2015 #2

    BvU

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    No need for question marks. You say it yourself: the food cal is the large calorie. Very unfortunate and very confusing, I agree.
    Well observed!
     
  4. Sep 3, 2015 #3

    CWatters

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    Makes me quite glad I was never taught about Calories.



    Personally I think it's much better to be explicit with the units eg..

    The specific heat capacity of water is 4.184 kJ/kg°C
     
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