Spinal cortisone and painkiller injections

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  • #1
Evo
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Main Question or Discussion Point

Wish me luck, tomorrow I am going in for multiple spinal injections.

I will be sedated YAY, and will have mulitple facet spinal injections, sacroilliac injections, and an epidural, all of pain killers and cortisone. The injections have to be guided through a fluoroscope ( a type of real time x-ray). Basically I have so many problems that were found in my last MRI, they're just going to do everything. Although that takes the least time and costs less, they won't have any idea which injections were necessary and which worked, which didn't. Hey, why not?

But that may not matter since the chances of success is usually only around 30%. If successful, pain relief may only last a week, can't be done more than 3 times a year and ultimately will destroy the cartillage in the area.

I had injections last year and I had a bad reaction, the pain got worse, not better, this happens. But they want to go whole hog this time.

My pain will increase for several days before it starts to get better, if it gets better. So, micromass will be my backup for the next few days if I can't sit up. (note to self, remind micro)
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Borek
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I hope everything will go well. Fingers crossed. Good luck.

Although knowing your history I am already afraid :cry:
 
  • #3
Monique
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Oh my, I wish you the best of luck!
 
  • #4
turbo
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Wow! I hate to have you subjected to the the vagaries of medical "sciences" to that extent. All the best... Come back to us at least a bit more comfortable and well.

This won't be a good day... Fear Factor. (my fear, not yours)
 
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  • #5
turbo
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As a "good luck" measure....



ALIENS!
 
  • #6
rhody
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Oh, God... Evo, I and your PF buddies will be thinking of you, I picture the hand of God guiding the Dr's instruments with their fluids into you in such a way as to cause you the least amount of pain.

About 7 years ago, when I was writhing on the floor curled up in pain from a kidney stone, barely able to breathe to break the tension, I called a co-worker and friend. He asked what was wrong, and I said, "Owwwww, Owwwww", etc... The conversation broke the pain long enough for me to gather myself and get my wife to drive me to the emergency room. At times like this a little laughter goes a long way. We laugh about it now too. Try to keep the light at the end of the tunnel in sight, it will help.

Rhody... o:)
 
  • #7
Doc Al
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Good luck, Evo!

(I've had a few spinal injections myself, so I know a little of what you're going through.)
 
  • #8
Evo
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I hope everything will go well. Fingers crossed. Good luck.

Although knowing your history I am already afraid :cry:
Oh my, I wish you the best of luck!
Wow! I hate to have you subjected to the the vagaries of medical "sciences" to that extent. All the best... Come back to us at least a bit more comfortable and well.

This won't be a good day... Fear Factor. (my fear, not yours)
Thanks guys, I was reading the pile of "this can happen" scenarios from the doctor and got called by 3 nurses yesterday warning me of things, had to go online and agree that death or paralysis was an ok alternative :frown:. It was kind of depressing.
 
  • #9
Evo
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Oh, God... Evo, I and your PF buddies will be thinking of you, I picture the hand of God guiding the Dr's instruments with their fluids into you in such a way as to cause you the least amount of pain.

About 7 years ago, when I was writhing on the floor curled up in pain from a kidney stone, barely able to breathe to break the tension, I called a co-worker and friend. He asked what was wrong, and I said, "Owwwww, Owwwww", etc... The conversation broke the pain long enough for me to gather myself and get my wife to drive me to the emergency room. At times like this a little laughter goes a long way. We laugh about it now too. Try to keep the light at the end of the tunnel in sight, it will help.

Rhody... o:)
Thanks humor always helps, I hope your surgery goes well. I feel for you.

Good luck, Evo!

(I've had a few spinal injections myself, so I know a little of what you're going through.)
Where they the guided ones? I'm surprised that they doing so many injections all at once, just the sacroiliac ones take a hour.
 
  • #10
lisab
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Best of luck - my thoughts are with you o:)!
 
  • #11
Monique
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Thanks guys, I was reading the pile of "this can happen" scenarios from the doctor and got called by 3 nurses yesterday warning me of things, had to go online and agree that death or paralysis was an ok alternative :frown:. It was kind of depressing.
That's not an ok alternative! I'm sure you'll pull through, you're one though lady judging from your record. Tell the doctors to take good care of you.

About 7 years ago, when I was writhing on the floor curled up in pain from a kidney stone, barely able to breathe to break the tension, I called a co-worker and friend. He asked what was wrong, and I said, "Owwwww, Owwwww", etc... The conversation broke the pain long enough for me to gather myself and get my wife to drive me to the emergency room. At times like this a little laughter goes a long way. We laugh about it now too. Try to keep the light at the end of the tunnel in sight, it will help.
What is it with kidney stones that makes them so painful? I had an attack a few weeks ago and didn't know what to do with myself, there was nothing that could ease the pain, no position that was even remotely comfortable. I've had pains before that would make me break out in a sweat and vomit, but the kidney stone broke the pain-intensity record.
 
  • #12
turbo
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Stones are not fun. I have had a few minor incidents, and they were crippling. And they were quite minor in the sense that the stones managed to navigate my ductwork and pass. Still those were painful days.
 
  • #14
Ryan_m_b
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I hope everything goes ok Evo! Hurry back soon.
 
  • #15
turbo
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I am terrified of stones after a few PF threads!
I spent a whole day stretched out in the front seat of a Caddy, driving from Atlanta to a plant in south Alabama (then gulf Florida), trying to ignore the pain. There were a couple of GP stalwarts in the back seat who were of the evangelical persuasion, and I tried a bit of humor. When we stopped at a supermarket, I told my project manager (who was driving) that even if we didn't need anything, we should go into the store and hang out in frozen foods to watch the womens' nipples get hard. That joke was not a crowd-pleaser with the tight-*** butt boys. By the time we got to our hotel, I had to send him out to get me a couple of 6-packs of beer. I drank as much as I could without using the bathroom. When I felt about to burst, I went to the bathroom and heard a little "clink". Nothing ever felt so good. Stay hydrated, Greg!! You might be interesting if you stay "thirsty", but I don't recommend it.

A co-worker's wife had her kidney-stones shattered with ultrasound, and passing the shards were "way" more painful than natural childbirth. I don't ever want to have significant stones to deal with.
 
  • #16
Doc Al
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Where they the guided ones? I'm surprised that they doing so many injections all at once, just the sacroiliac ones take a hour.
Yes, mine were guided via fluoroscope. I had a very positive result. The first one relieved about 95% of the problem; the second took care of the last 5%.

That was quite a while ago. A few years ago, I had a sudden 'attack' of lower back pain--ended up being a ruptured disk. (Felt like I was struck by lightning!) I'm OK now, but the toes of my left foot are still numb.

I am obsessive about back exercises now!

I'm hoping for the best for you!
 
  • #17
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I'm really worried :cry:

I really hope that things go alright. Let us know something when it's finished, ok??

:cry:
 
  • #18
rhody
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I am terrified of stones after a few PF threads!
The only thing that may come close, Greg, is voluntarily eating a whole ghost pepper, or worse, a trinidad scorpion pepper. Different kind of pain, but I would put the sympathetic nervous system pain on the same level as physical nervous system pain.

I have experienced both. The only saving grace with eating a hot pepper is that you know there is an end to it in less than a half of an hour. :devil:

Rhody...
 
  • #19
turbo
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Eating hot chilies is a choice. Waking up with a stabbing non-relieving pain in your lower abdomen/extremities is not too fun. Stones ain't fun. It's one thing to have "heat" moving through the digestive tract. It is entirely another matter to have stones "ice-picking" your urinary tract for as long as that can last. No fun.
 
  • #20
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Hi Evo

My thoughts are with you.

All the best

Andre
 
  • #21
Evo
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Yes, mine were guided via fluoroscope. I had a very positive result. The first one relieved about 95% of the problem; the second took care of the last 5%.

That was quite a while ago. A few years ago, I had a sudden 'attack' of lower back pain--ended up being a ruptured disk. (Felt like I was struck by lightning!) I'm OK now, but the toes of my left foot are still numb.

I am obsessive about back exercises now!

I'm hoping for the best for you!
I survived and am home. I have diffuse bulging discs, spinal stenosis, pinched nerves, I have bone spurs, and advanced degenerative spinal disease, multilevel lumbar spondylosis, and anterolisthesis, as the diagnostic summary.

The doctor told me that I can expect the pain to increase over the next 6 months if the injections are helping. :uhh: (Due to a difference in muscle use) Great. As the nurse wheeled me out she told me not to give up if the injections don't help, she said most people have to return several times before they start to improve.

Right now I just have a lot of stinging along my spine from the injections and the same pain in my rear. Same leg pain. But, it says that it takes 5-6 days to start working. Blegh.
 
  • #22
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I survived and am home. I have diffuse bulging discs, spinal stenosis, pinched nerves, I have bone spurs, and advanced degenerative spinal disease, multilevel lumbar spondylosis, and anterolisthesis, as the diagnostic summary.

The doctor told me that I can expect the pain to increase over the next 6 months if the injections are helping. :uhh: (Due to a difference in muscle use) Great. As the nurse wheeled me out she told me not to give up if the injections don't help, she said most people have to return several times before they start to improve.

Right now I just have a lot of stinging along my spine from the injections and the same pain in my rear. Same leg pain. But, it says that it takes 5-6 days to start working. Blegh.
Oh my God. I'm so relieved that everything is alright :redface:
I hope the injections start working soon and that the stupid pain starts going away.
 
  • #23
turbo
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As the nurse wheeled me out she told me not to give up if the injections don't help, she said most people have to return several times before they start to improve.

Right now I just have a lot of stinging along my spine from the injections and the same pain in my rear. Same leg pain. But, it says that it takes 5-6 days to start working. Blegh.
Wahhh! Why? Doesn't "medicine work ?
 
  • #24
Evo
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Wahhh! Why? Doesn't "medicine work ?
There could be too much inflamation for one set of injections to relieve. There could be permanent nerve damage (they think I have). There could be physical problems (bone spurs) (I have). There could be incurable progressive spinal disease (I have). So, it's a waiting game. I had 2 injections last year that didn't work, but they wanted to try again with a BUNCH of injections all at once.

I know I have to wait, if they help, the results won't be immediate. I will stay positive.

There's always surgery as an option. But I prefer going the injection route in the hope that it gives me enough relief. I just want to sleep.
 
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  • #25
lisab
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There could be too much inflamation for one set of injections to relieve. There could be permanent nerve damage (they think I have). There could be physical problems (bone spurs) (I have). There could be incurable progressive spinal disease (I have). So, it's a waiting game. I had 2 injections last year that didn't work, but they wanted to try again with a BUNCH of injections all at once.

I know I have to wait, if they help, the results won't be immediate. I will stay positive.

There's always surgery as an option. But I prefer going the injection route in the hope that it gives me enough relief. I just want to sleep.
I hope for the very best outcome for you!
 

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