Spring constant of a bent pvc pipe

In summary, the conversation discusses the calculation of the initial velocity of a released PVC pipe after being bent. It involves using the equation for potential energy (PE = Kmgh) and determining the spring constant (k) based on the given force of 50N. It is mentioned that the pipe is bent over a triangle-shaped crossbeam with an axel through the other end. The potential energy is calculated to be 2,500J and there is a question about the accuracy of the spring constant and the displacement of the pipe. The actual length of the pipe is about 0.4 meters and the displacement is estimated to be 0.5 or 0.6 meters.
  • #1
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I am calculating the initial velocity of a released pvc pipe after it has been bent. I would like to know if i have this correct.

Potential energy = Kmgh; I have my mg and it is 50N, so PE = k*50*h;

I have been told that k is the spring constant of my bent pvc pipe. Therefore since I have 50N already i can say that k = -50/h. h is my displacement so I am going to say for experiment's sake that my displacement is 10m. therefore my spring constant is -5N/m.

So now we can say PE = (-5)*50*10(once again 10 is my displacement).

Does this mean that my potential energy is 2,500J? Also is my spring constant correct?
 
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  • #2
Has your pipe really been bent 10 meters? That's about the height of a three-story building.

How long is this pipe? Is it fixed at one end with the other end deflected?
 
  • #3
Haha that was a rhetorical length. My real length will be about .4 meters. And my displacement will probably be .5 or .6. And there is an axel through the other end. It is bent over a triangle shaped crossbeam.
 

1. What is the spring constant of a bent PVC pipe?

The spring constant of a bent PVC pipe refers to the stiffness or rigidity of the pipe when it is bent. It is a measure of how much force is required to bend the pipe a certain distance.

2. How is the spring constant of a bent PVC pipe calculated?

The spring constant of a bent PVC pipe can be calculated using Hooke's law, which states that the force applied to an object is directly proportional to the object's displacement from its equilibrium position. This can be expressed mathematically as k = F/x, where k is the spring constant, F is the applied force, and x is the displacement.

3. What factors affect the spring constant of a bent PVC pipe?

The spring constant of a bent PVC pipe can be affected by several factors, including the material properties of the pipe, the diameter and thickness of the pipe, and the angle and degree of the bend. These factors can influence the stiffness and flexibility of the pipe, thus affecting the spring constant.

4. Can the spring constant of a bent PVC pipe be changed?

Yes, the spring constant of a bent PVC pipe can be changed by altering the factors that affect it. For example, using a pipe with a different material or thickness can result in a different spring constant. The angle and degree of the bend can also be adjusted to change the stiffness of the pipe.

5. How is the spring constant of a bent PVC pipe used in practical applications?

The spring constant of a bent PVC pipe is often used in practical applications such as engineering and construction. It can help determine the amount of force needed to bend the pipe or to support a certain weight. It is also used in industries such as plumbing and irrigation to ensure that pipes can withstand the necessary pressure and weight without breaking or deforming.

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