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Stability of the matter

  1. Oct 28, 2014 #1
    Hi everyone,

    I know that classical mechanics and electromagnetism show that the electron is bound to fall on the nucleus.
    I want to estimate the duration of the phenomenon.

    I found the classical energy : E=-K/r and I'm able to compute the raying loss thanks to electromagnetism.
    But I am still not able to conclude.

    Where can I find a paper or a site that explain it ?

    Excuse my mistakes I am French.

    Thank you !
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 2, 2014 #2
    Thanks for the post! Sorry you aren't generating responses at the moment. Do you have any further information, come to any new conclusions or is it possible to reword the post?
     
  4. Nov 3, 2014 #3
    Hi Greg,

    My question didn't got answers by the time but now it's not very important, it was just a small question I asked myself whil learning quantum mechanics. In fact the real problem I wasn't able to solve is to compute the $$ \overrightarrow{B} $$ ray from an electron rotating around the nucleus. If you have answers to that thank you for sharing.
     
  5. Nov 3, 2014 #4

    Drakkith

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    Staff: Mentor

    Hmmm. You may want to ask that question in the Quantum Physics forum.
     
  6. Nov 3, 2014 #5

    Nugatory

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    Staff: Mentor

    www.physics.princeton.edu/~mcdonald/examples/orbitdecay.pdf is an OK summary.
     
  7. Nov 5, 2014 #6
    Use the Larmor formula, and calculate the acceleration.
     
  8. Nov 7, 2014 #7
    Hi everyone and thank you for your answers. I already found myself a solution to this probleme using the Larmor formula and the real problem is the Larmor formula, I know how to etablish it but I don't understand why it works in the problem of an electron rotating.
     
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