Storing Lightning Energy

  • Thread starter reinaldo
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  • #26
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sn bose's idea seams good by passing the current through a heating element and heating water .

Watch this cool video a guy gets in a car and they hit with 800,00 volts ,
I bet they could test this at the high-voltage lab in berlin
 
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  • #27
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Although lightening is high in volts it is low in energy. Volts are not a unit of energy. If you were to build something to capture it it would run your house for about 15-30 secs.

The other problem would be forecasting it (currently not possible unless Doc got shot in the mall parking lot and you find yourself in a Dalorian in the 1950's).

It's just not cost effective.....
I begin quoting this definition from Wikipedia :
"The voltage between two points is a short name for the electrical force that would drive an electric current between those points. Specifically, voltage is equal to energy per unit charge."

Well first Lightning is negatively charged particles coming from the sky ( maybe because of the interaction between clouds that's caused by wind ) .. These negatively charges contact the positive charges present in the water/land causing the discharge we see ..
so why would it be with low energy ?
the energy here is in the form of electric energy with very high voltage .. so this high voltage will cause the presence of high electric energy .. right ?!
 
  • #28
sorry to kind of break the discussion but why can't you guys spell "Lightning"?
Please. It's ambarrassing.
 
  • #29
now for my actual comment...
i think being able to harness the energy caused by lightning would be very useful, especially if you lived in an area where thunderstorms are abundant, such as Los Alamos, NM.
Combine that with solar panels and wind turbines and you're set, for the most part. Then you can just hook up your treadmill to a generator. :P
But seriously, I think it is very possible to use lightning as a source of power. it will just take some thought to be able to make a device that can withstand the initial shock.
 
  • #30
QuantumPion
Science Advisor
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How about a blimp grounded by a long copper tether? :D
 
  • #31
How about a blimp grounded by a long copper tether? :D
XD nice I think that's a good idea.
 
  • #32
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I know that you can store lightening theoreticaly, as i have worked on a theory for over ten years, and at the time of conception there were no such thing as carbon nanotube batteries without which the rest of my designed system would be very difficult to store large quantitys of charge in a short space of time.

P.S i am waiting for a company to take on this development as it is theory, that i believe could be tested and trialed at low cost before production.
Good health Dubist
 
  • #33
68
0
My first intuition would say that if you would try to charge a capacitor with a bolt of lightning, you'd just melt your capacitor. Remember, we're talking about a voltage high enough to discharge through at least tens of meters of air, so I highly doubt there is a man-made capacitor that can take these voltages without breaking.
Contrary to what most here think about capacitors, IMO, they can be used.

If anyone has seen very large and high performance Van De Graaf Generators(alternately, Pelletron machines) used to simulate lightning for EMP - Proof - testing equipment, they are also in many ways, a capacitor by their nature of storing electrical charge. The sphere as plate of a capacitor and air as dielectric.

I believe such capacitor designed to capture lightning charge would look not much different from a very large Van De Graaf Generator. Also using air as dielectric and using alternating bands of conductive rings or plates (with rounded edges) between the main plates to improve efficiency (reduce corona discharge).
 
  • #34
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Funnily enough i have a side element to my system just as you describe. It is a large pre chamber if used, to slow the intial shock of the large emf and allow a few more milliseconds of charge decay which i still have a few issues with. i was toying with the idea of using different gasses to further the decay, but there are system impedance issues that are within tight parameters.
 
  • #35
I know that you can store lightening theoreticaly, as i have worked on a theory for over ten years, and at the time of conception there were no such thing as carbon nanotube batteries without which the rest of my designed system would be very difficult to store large quantitys of charge in a short space of time.

P.S i am waiting for a company to take on this development as it is theory, that i believe could be tested and trialed at low cost before production.
Good health Dubist
In that case...
PLEASE FOR THE LOVE OF GOD...
Spell lightning correctly.
Please, are you in college? postgrad? professor?
Then PLEASE spell Lightning right.
and Quantities as well.
 

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