Structure of the Milky Way?

Do Red Dwarf Systems tend to have more solid planets?
And can there start evolving life in any of these systems?
And another question: If a nebula has about 100 or more light years in diameter and if it is very thick and mostly composed out of H2 what type of stars tend to take birth in there?
And can they have solid planets rather than gas giants?
Can someone read this questions?
 
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Our knowledge of extrasolar planets is very limited. Even more so, that of rocky planets. Rocky planets are extremely difficult to detect with current technology, as they're too small.

So it's hard to answer if red dwarfs tend to have more solid planets or not. They do have less giant planets.
There are many problems with habitability around red dwarfs:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Habitability_of_red_dwarf_systems
 
-And can there start evolving life in any of these systems?
-And another question: If a nebula has about 100 or more light years in diameter and if it is very thick and mostly composed out of H2 what type of stars tend to take birth in there?
And can they have solid planets rather than gas giants?
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and what about this?
 
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"-And can there start evolving life in any of these systems?"
Because of the habitability problems explained on that wikipedia page, advanced life is less likely to evolve than around Sun-like stars.

"-And another question: If a nebula has about 100 or more light years in diameter and if it is very thick and mostly composed out of H2 what type of stars tend to take birth in there?
And can they have solid planets rather than gas giants?"
I don't know what kind of stars would take birth in that nebula. However, it will certainly have some amounts of heavier elements, so rocky planets are possible.
Whether a planet is rocky or not, is mostly about its size. Small planets won't be able to hold their hydrogen and helium, so they'll become rocky.
Larger planets, gas giants, still have rocky interiors, of various sizes.
 

Chalnoth

Science Advisor
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Whether a planet is rocky or not, is mostly about its size. Small planets won't be able to hold their hydrogen and helium, so they'll become rocky.
Well, you actually have to have the light elements blown away by the star in order to form a rocky planet. Otherwise you'll just get a gas giant with a rocky core.
 

Chronos

Science Advisor
Gold Member
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But, a huge gas giant could be perturbed into a tighter orbit after it had already formed. Its massive gravity would slow loss of its atmosphere for a long time.
 
But, a huge gas giant could be perturbed into a tighter orbit after it had already formed. Its massive gravity would slow loss of its atmosphere for a long time.
How long will keep it's atmosphere?
Tousands, M\Hundreds of tousands, Millions, Tens of millions of years... BILLIONS????:confused:
 
Otherwise you'll just get a gas giant with a rocky core.
but Would't the rocky core get crushed under the mass of the atmosphere and become a liquid... Or diamonds if it has a significant ammount of carbon?
 
"
"-And another question: If a nebula has about 100 or more light years in diameter and if it is very thick and mostly composed out of H2 what type of stars tend to take birth in there?
And can they have solid planets rather than gas giants?"

I don't know what kind of stars would take birth in that nebula.
If the nebulla is so thick and mostly composed out of H2 wouldn't there be a significant ammount of Blue giands or super giants of stars as there is plenty of material to form out of?
 
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"How long will keep it's atmosphere?
Tousands, M\Hundreds of tousands, Millions, Tens of millions of years... BILLIONS????"
Billions of years, at least. There are plenty of examples of gas giants that orbit their stars very closely. It is assumed they formed further away and they later migrated closer to the star.

"but Would't the rocky core get crushed under the mass of the atmosphere and become a liquid... Or diamonds if it has a significant ammount of carbon?"
Yes, because of the very high amounts of pressure, it will change its state. I don't know if it will be molten or not.
But that happens in the core of our planet as well. The very core of our planet is solid, surrounded by a larger, molten region. So at extreme pressures you can get a solid core even with very high temperatures.
 
The very core of our planet is solid, surrounded by a larger, molten region. So at extreme pressures you can get a solid core even with very high temperatures.
With that i agree with you...
-But this kind of event can hapopen to any kind of material even water...
Recent discoveries of theoretical ocean worlds or super earths that are almost 100% water, if they are big enaugh their core can get solid; ice7, right?
And what about the recently discovered Kepler-22b?
Studies show that it could be another ocean world...
I don't quite remember its theoretical size but could it have a rocky underwater surface or its all the way down to another ice7 core?
-And could it have small rocky islands?
-Could it be colonized?
 
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With that i agree with you...
-But this kind of event can hapopen to any kind of material even water...
Recent discoveries of theoretical ocean worlds or super earths that are almost 100% water, if they are big enaugh their core can get solid; ice7, right?
And what about the recently discovered Kepler-22b?
Studies show that it could be another ocean world...
I don't quite remember its theoretical size but could it have a rocky underwater surface or its all the way down to another ice7 core?
-And could it have small rocky islands?
-Could it be colonized?
Heeey... no answer to this????
 
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but Would't the rocky core get crushed under the mass of the atmosphere and become a liquid... Or diamonds if it has a significant ammount of carbon?
No, puting a liquid under ridiculous amounts of pressure (with a few exceptions such as water and gallium) results in a solid, not the other way around.
 
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No, puting a liquid under ridiculous amounts of pressure (with a few exceptions such as water and gallium) results in a solid, not the other way around.
as far as I know, with water it's even believed that under sufficiently extreme pressures an exotic or exotic forms of ice can be formed.
 
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No, puting a liquid under ridiculous amounts of pressure (with a few exceptions such as water and gallium) results in a solid, not the other way around.
True. The molten core is a result of temperature, not pressure.
However, what you're saying about water or gallium is false. They will turn to solid just fine.

In regards to water turning to ice at high pressure, I've seen experiments with diamond anvil doing just that.
 
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In which case I stand corrected.
 

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