The James Webb Space Telescope

  • #386
pinball1970
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I had a quick search on Webb for updates on that issue with MIRI

I did not find anything.

This image was on the site though, “Webb Reveals Shells of Dust Surrounding Brilliant Binary Star System.”

1666253408455.png


What is this top right? It looks very symmetrical in shape and colour, just an optical effect from the telescope like diffraction spikes?

1666253518991.png
 
  • #387
sophiecentaur
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just an optical effect from the telescope like diffraction spikes?
You may be right but if the effect is being introduced locally (to the telescope) then what could be special about the light from the star? It doesn't occur for other stars.
The effect seems to be a rare one.
Those regular fringes extend over millions of km, if we assume they're actually around the star. There's nothing that uniform around a star so if it were 'waves of ejecta', due to regular explosions, the spacing would change with distance unless the speeds are colossal and the star's gravity is having negligible effect. A series of images, over a long period, could reveal motion but wouldn't that require a very long timescale?
 
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  • #388
Borg
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just an optical effect from the telescope like diffraction spikes?
Maybe dust from the main star being imaged? The other stars may be in front of the dust.
 
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  • #389
sophiecentaur
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Maybe dust from the main star being imaged? The other stars may be in front of the dust.
Possibly but no apparent colour fringes and the star is not monochromatic.
Weird.
 
  • #391
pinball1970
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Side side with Hubble on the left from 2014
I turned on all the lights off in the office so I could see this in all its glory.
Wow.

1666268948780.png
 
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  • #392
hutchphd
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Weird.
Perhaps I am reading tea leaves. The hexagonal pattern is obviously from the optics (likely the mirror shape) but to my eye the green shape is rotated 30o relatve to the red one. I having trouble figuring a plausability argument for that, either diffraction or refraction. One also should be cognizant that these are false colors.
 
  • #393
sophiecentaur
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But why aren’t all (bright) star images like it?
 
  • #394
hutchphd
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But why aren’t all (bright) star images like it?
My best guess (I just thought of it) is that it looks like the internal "camera" reflection from either the bright object in field or perhaps one just out of field off axis. I don't know enough about Webb optics to be any more definitive
 
  • #395
pinball1970
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My best guess (I just thought of it) is that it looks like the internal "camera" reflection from either the bright object in field or perhaps one just out of field off axis. I don't know enough about Webb optics to be any more definitive
I tried blowing up some of the other objects but they all were too blurred.
 
  • #397
berkeman
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I tried blowing up some of the other objects
Did you borrow Peter's blaster again? I thought we already had "the talk" about that... :wink:

1666288436083.png

https://www.deviantart.com/nocturnbros/art/Marvin-the-Martian-invades-DEATH-BATTLE-683673659
 
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  • #398
pinball1970
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Is there a NASA source to get such images with full resolution?
The image is from the NASA site. I have been looking at other images and cannot see anything like this.
Dust has been mentioned, if it is fairly evenly distributed then could the rings which look almost concentric cause that effect via some sort diffraction?
 
  • #401
sophiecentaur
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some sort diffraction?
But there are no coloured edges and you don't get diffraction effects from massive objects (i.e. out in space). Diffraction would have to be taking place the telescope optics and would apply to many images of the appropriate brightness.

The explanation that it's due to ripples in dust, caused by regular pulses of light certainly gets my vote. 1. Regular pattern. 2. No colour effects. 3. The fact that it's a rare effect indicates some very high energy involved.
 
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  • #402
Filip Larsen
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https://arxiv.org/abs/2210.10074
with a nice write-up by John Timmer at
https://arstechnica.com/science/202...ed-from-galaxies-11-billion-light-years-away/

New Webb images illuminate the formation of a galaxy cluster​

A team of researchers is publishing a paper based on new images taken by the Webb Space Telescope. The images reveal a dense concentration of matter in the early Universe, potentially indicating early stages in the formation of a galaxy cluster. And thanks to the spectrograph present, Webb was able to confirm that several galaxies previously imaged by Hubble were also part of the cluster. It even tracked the flow of gas ejected by the largest galaxy present.
image-11-800x924.png
 
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  • #403
berkeman
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Thread is closed temporarily for Moderation (and possible thread split to break off the side-discussion about diffraction effects in telescopes)...
 
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  • #405
Filip Larsen
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https://esawebb.org/news/weic2219/?lang :
The NASA/ESA/CSA James Webb Space Telescope has revealed the once-hidden features of the protostar within the dark cloud L1527 with its Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam), providing insight into the formation of a new star. These blazing clouds within the Taurus star-forming region are only visible in infrared light, making it an ideal target for Webb.
weic2219a.jpg
 
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  • #406
pinball1970
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They have fixed the issue with MIRI apparently. Nothing on the NASA site though.
 
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  • #407
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Analysis of micrometeorite impacts shows that the May event was likely really bad luck and should stay an outlier instead of a regular occurrence.

 
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  • #408
sophiecentaur
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Which one of those two guys actually threw the test brick? It would certainly be a CV item for him.
 
  • #409
BillTre
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Make your own JWST.

 
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