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The speed of sound in nothing but a suit

  1. Oct 25, 2006 #1

    Ivan Seeking

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    http://www.centennialofflight.gov/essay/Explorers_Record_Setters_and_Daredevils/Kittinger/EX31.htm

    Some sources claim that he actually broke the sound barrier!
    Which comes from this article on the new sport of spacediving
    http://www.space.com/businesstechnology/technology/space_diving_010608-1.html

    It has always been my dream to have a re-entry suit. Base jumpers, eat your hearts out! :biggrin:
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 25, 2006 #2

    wolram

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    Why does he have a squashed chicken on his bum?
     
  4. Oct 25, 2006 #3

    Ivan Seeking

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    That acts as his low drag chute.

    ... hang on to the legs...
     
  5. Oct 25, 2006 #4
    Terminal velocity =: energy lost to drag = energy gained from gravity and change in height.
    Or drag force = gravity.

    If the drag is low and dense enough then terminal velocity can exceed the speed of sound (a compression wave in the medium).

    Note that aerodynamic drag grow as the square of the velocity subsonic and even faster supersonic.

    If the air is thin enough an object in free fall could go supersonic.
    This would depend on shape (drag factor) size (surface are) and density (relative to media and total mass)

    The British WW II Grand Slam 10,000 Kg bombs is supersonic even at level.
     
  6. Oct 25, 2006 #5
    :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

    Embedded there from his first landing in a barnyard.
     
  7. Oct 25, 2006 #6

    Astronuc

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    If something is de-orbiting from 17,000 mph, then yes, there is sufficient heating to deep roast someone. :rofl: The heating on the SR-71 at Mach 3 is significant, even at 85,000+ ft.

    If one is suborbital and starts at zero speed, then one could probably survive. I wouldn't mind giving it a try. :biggrin:
     
  8. Oct 25, 2006 #7

    russ_watters

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    I doubt you could survive it from too much higher than he did it. SR-71 pilots would be cooked without substantial air conditioning as the skin temp even at 2,000mph and 85,000 feet is 900 degrees. If the air is thin and doesn't inhibit acceleration much, you can go from zero to 2000mph in about 90 seconds, consuming 130,000 feet of altitude. Perhaps a parachute would help, but I suspect if you jumped from 200,000 feet, there wouldn't be enough drag in freefall to keep your speed down until you got to that thicker air at 80,000 feet.
     
  9. Oct 25, 2006 #8
    ... :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: are you guys really trying to say its impossible after the guy did it??
     
  10. Oct 25, 2006 #9
    Another sad example of everyone believeing what they read, without even thinking if its legit...
     
  11. Oct 25, 2006 #10

    russ_watters

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    Read what I said, slugcountry.... I said it probably isn't possible from too much higher than he did it. People are also talking about other things, like re-entry from orbit at orbital speed or altitude. This guy just jumped from 102,800 feet (nowhere near orbit) and zero speed.
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2006
  12. Oct 25, 2006 #11
    I agreee with Russ

    This guy is wearing a suit that at first protected him from the cold at that altitude. At lower altitudes and higher speed it would protect him from the effects of the atmosphere trying to pull his skin off.
     
  13. Oct 25, 2006 #12
    I never said i didnt agree with you...
     
  14. Aug 22, 2007 #13

    Astronuc

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    I'll have to work up to this - :tongue2: :biggrin:

    Space Parachuting: Skydiving from the Edge
    http://www.dropzone.com/news/SpaceParachutingSkydivin.shtml

    http://www.stratoquest.com/mission1.html
    http://www.stratoquest.com/cheryl1.html

    HIGH ALTITUDE LOW OPENING
    http://www.halojumper.com/

    Given my work schedule, it'll take at least a year to qualify for the Halo Jump.

    Fortunately, this place is not too far away and it has some wonderful scenery. I was hiking nearby just two weeks ago.
    http://www.theblueskyranch.com/pricing.php
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2007
  15. Aug 23, 2007 #14

    Ivan Seeking

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    How about a strato jump with Jetman wings. :biggrin:
     
  16. Aug 23, 2007 #15
    What's that box for? Is that where he keeps his HUGE BALLS?
     
  17. Aug 23, 2007 #16

    Astronuc

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    Actually, I am thinking about something along those lines. :biggrin:


    This activity expands the meaning of "may I drop in". :rofl:
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2007
  18. Aug 23, 2007 #17
    now all we need is a space elevator. the ultimate base jump!
     
  19. Oct 20, 2007 #18

    Ivan Seeking

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    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/li...ogy.html?in_article_id=488426&in_page_id=1965
     
  20. Oct 20, 2007 #19

    Chi Meson

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    Damn than wallet of mine!
     
  21. Oct 20, 2007 #20

    Astronuc

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    It takes more than 200 jumps to qualify to the level where one can jump from high altitude. It'll take some serious effort to qualify for jumping from space.

    I don't see how this helps astronaut safety since craft like the shuttle are going supersonic in the upper atmosphere. Anyone exiting gets hit immediately from still air to supersonic air - which would hurt.

    Anyone jumping from space will be starting near zero velocity - presumably.


    It would seem prudent for astronauts to be using escape capsules rather than suits.
     
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