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Theory of Gearing

  1. May 24, 2013 #1
    Folks,

    I have a book Gear Geometry and Applied Theory by Litvin. It looks pretty hairy and the diagrams/schematics of the kinematic relations etc are difficult to understand.
    What branch of mathematics does this fall under, diferential geometry and topology?

    I think I may need to get some introductory book before I delve into this gear theory...

    Any suggestions?

    Thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 24, 2013 #2

    SteamKing

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    I would say more towards analytic geometry. Unless you are actually trying to understand how to design the different gear profiles, I wouldn't lose much sleep over this book. The essential bit is knowing how the gear ratio affects shaft speed and torque.
     
  4. May 24, 2013 #3
    you dont have to go in deep maths..u can understand theory of gearing if u have little bit knowledge of design..u should read theory of machines by khurmi and gupta
     
  5. May 28, 2013 #4
    If you're interested in doing more than just working with gears, like designing different involute profiles or analyzing forces on the teeth (which isn't the case for 99% of people), then I'm sure that's a good resource. Otherwise, SteamKing's suggestion is the best course of action.
     
  6. May 29, 2013 #5
    Shigley's Mechanical Engineering Design - Chapters 13, 14, 15 (in the 8th Edition) are for gears - has everything you need to know.
     
  7. Sep 30, 2014 #6

    OldEngr63

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    For involute gears, the branch of mathematics is called involutometry. As noted, most of this you don't need to derive if you are willing to accept the results without proof.
     
  8. Oct 1, 2014 #7

    Baluncore

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  9. Oct 2, 2014 #8

    OldEngr63

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    The OP asked for some introductory material on gearing. I would suggest

    Mechanical Engineering Design - Shigley & Mischke
    Mechanics of Machines - Doughty
    Mechanisms and Dynamics of Machinery - Mabie & Ockvirk
     
  10. Dec 26, 2014 #9
    Darle Dudely - Gear Handbook is very good. A good understanding of analytical geometry is required.
     
  11. Dec 26, 2014 #10

    OldEngr63

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    I would second the Dudley book, Gear Handbook, if you can find a copy. This book is very hard to locate.
     
  12. Dec 26, 2014 #11

    Baluncore

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  13. Dec 26, 2014 #12
    You do have a very good book about gears in deep. You can calculate second order geometry of hypoid gears, for instance. I think you only need to know differential geometry and kinematics.
     
  14. Dec 27, 2014 #13
    I have gone through the whole book several times.There is a gear design software called kissoft. I have customers sources too throughout the world. . .Please suggest me something.
     
  15. Dec 27, 2014 #14

    OldEngr63

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    What do you want/mean when you say, "Please suggest me something"?
     
  16. Sep 4, 2016 #15
    Are you still studying gear design.
     
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