Theory of Gearing

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Main Question or Discussion Point

Folks,

I have a book Gear Geometry and Applied Theory by Litvin. It looks pretty hairy and the diagrams/schematics of the kinematic relations etc are difficult to understand.
What branch of mathematics does this fall under, diferential geometry and topology?

I think I may need to get some introductory book before I delve into this gear theory...

Any suggestions?

Thanks
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
SteamKing
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I would say more towards analytic geometry. Unless you are actually trying to understand how to design the different gear profiles, I wouldn't lose much sleep over this book. The essential bit is knowing how the gear ratio affects shaft speed and torque.
 
  • #3
you dont have to go in deep maths..u can understand theory of gearing if u have little bit knowledge of design..u should read theory of machines by khurmi and gupta
 
  • #4
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If you're interested in doing more than just working with gears, like designing different involute profiles or analyzing forces on the teeth (which isn't the case for 99% of people), then I'm sure that's a good resource. Otherwise, SteamKing's suggestion is the best course of action.
 
  • #5
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Shigley's Mechanical Engineering Design - Chapters 13, 14, 15 (in the 8th Edition) are for gears - has everything you need to know.
 
  • #6
OldEngr63
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For involute gears, the branch of mathematics is called involutometry. As noted, most of this you don't need to derive if you are willing to accept the results without proof.
 
  • #7
Baluncore
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  • #8
OldEngr63
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The OP asked for some introductory material on gearing. I would suggest

Mechanical Engineering Design - Shigley & Mischke
Mechanics of Machines - Doughty
Mechanisms and Dynamics of Machinery - Mabie & Ockvirk
 
  • #9
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Darle Dudely - Gear Handbook is very good. A good understanding of analytical geometry is required.
 
  • #10
OldEngr63
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I would second the Dudley book, Gear Handbook, if you can find a copy. This book is very hard to locate.
 
  • #12
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You do have a very good book about gears in deep. You can calculate second order geometry of hypoid gears, for instance. I think you only need to know differential geometry and kinematics.
 
  • #13
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I have gone through the whole book several times.There is a gear design software called kissoft. I have customers sources too throughout the world. . .Please suggest me something.
 
  • #14
OldEngr63
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What do you want/mean when you say, "Please suggest me something"?
 
  • #15
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Folks,

I have a book Gear Geometry and Applied Theory by Litvin. It looks pretty hairy and the diagrams/schematics of the kinematic relations etc are difficult to understand.
What branch of mathematics does this fall under, diferential geometry and topology?

I think I may need to get some introductory book before I delve into this gear theory...

Any suggestions?

Thanks
Are you still studying gear design.
 

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