Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Thermodynamic Properties of high pressure gases

  1. Oct 28, 2009 #1
    Hi,

    Anyone know where I can find thermodynamic properties of gases at high pressure? More specifically I need to find the kinematic viscosity or the absolute viscosity of air at around 300 degrees Kelvin and 330 bar.

    Cheers
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 28, 2009 #2

    minger

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    It depends on what gas and who you talk to. All the major aerospace companies for example have their own version of air tables (for high temp/high pressure). They can vary quite significantly.
     
  4. Oct 28, 2009 #3

    Mech_Engineer

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    http://webbook.nist.gov/chemistry/fluid/" [Broken] should have the data you're after. Otherwise, a thermodynamic properties of air table at the local school library would have it too. You might even be able to find a table online if you search in google for "themodynamic properties of air."
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  5. Oct 29, 2009 #4

    stewartcs

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    Air @ 300 K and 330 bar:

    Kin. Viscosity = 0.00000090477 (ft²/s)

    CS
     
  6. Oct 30, 2009 #5


    Thank-you for this, could you tell me how you calculated/where you found this data? Just so I can do it for myself in future as I reckon I will have a range of other pressures and temps to calculate kinematic viscosity for in future.

    Thanks
     
  7. Oct 30, 2009 #6

    stewartcs

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    NIST has a program called REFPROP 8.0 that gives this information. Check the link above from Mech_Engineer and they will probably have a link for it. It cost $200 for copy last time I checked.

    CS
     
  8. Jul 24, 2011 #7
    Hi
    I used ASPEN to find the answer
    At 300K and 330 bar
    Dynamic Viscosity=0.0299 cp =2.99e-5 Pa.sec
    Kinematic Viscosity=8.566e-8 m^2/sec
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook