Thesis writing

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I dont know more about "Scientific workplace" but MS Word is fine for writing. One more thing before start the writing need to collect materials about your topic.

One FREE and simple program I use for keeping track of research-related papers is EverNote (www.evernote.com). You can store practically anything in EverNote, from webpages to pdfs. You can even use your computer's webcam to take pictures of something (e.g., a written note) and file it away. EverNote has a search feature so you can search by tags, author name, or even individual words; it's never failed to find what I'm looking for.

The best part of EverNote is that it backs up your data ONLINE, so it's accessible from any computer. So, if you're at school and don't have your laptop handy but need to find a particular paper, you can log onto EverNote's website and get it.
 
  • #27
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LaTex is the most accepted and once learned the easiest.

I agree about LaTeX being super easy once you've caught on to it. If you're new to it, you can always just copy and paste a header--something compatible with the document style you want--and start from there. Typing text into LaTeX is pretty much like any word processor: you just type and voilà it's there. Leave a completely blank horizontal space (i.e., skip a line) to start a new paragraph. To do equations, something simple like \\begin{equation} ... \\end{equation}" (but with just one slash instead of two) is pretty much all you need. If you want to start a new section, just type \section{name of section} and you're good to go. If you get stuck and don't know how to do a particular something, just Google it and you'll have the answer in no time.
 

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