Three Charged Particles in an xy-plane

  • #1
Question:

A particle of charge 4.96 nC is placed at the origin of an xy-coordinate system, and a second particle of charge -1.95 nC is placed on the positive x-axis at x = 3.99 cm. A third particle, of charge 6.04 nC is now placed at the point x = 3.99 cm, y = 3.05 cm.

Part A

Find the x-component of the total force exerted on the third charge by the other two.
Use 8.85 * 10^(−12) C^2/(N*m^2)for the permittivity of free space.


I drew the first quadrant of an xy-plane and labeled the three particles. The force of one on three is 8.99*10^9)(4.96*10^(-9))(6.04\cdot10^(-9))/(.0502^2).
which equals 1.07*10^(-4) N.

The x-component for this is 1.07*10^(-4)*(3.99)/(5.02). I believe there is no x-component for the second particle.

Am I right? I couldn't get the LaTeX to work, I apologize for that.
 
Last edited:

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Office_Shredder
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If you're saying the second particle exerts no force on the third particle in the x direction, then yes
 
  • #3
Thanks

My professor uses Mastering Physics. I get five tries per part, and I usually start freaking out if I miss a few.

I got the entire question right. I just needed to calm down and consider a free-body diagram.
 

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