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B Time of flight objects in air versus in vacuum

  1. Oct 30, 2016 #1
    Hello
    I needed to know a logical answer to the question that whether the time of flight of the objects in air increases or decreases as compared to vacuum? Why?
     
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  3. Oct 30, 2016 #2

    Drakkith

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    What do you think?
     
  4. Oct 30, 2016 #3
    I reckon that the time should decrease as the height approached (of a vertically thrown object for instance) decreases
     
  5. Oct 30, 2016 #4

    Drakkith

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    What do you mean by "the height approached"?
     
  6. Oct 30, 2016 #5
    Max vertical height approached
     
  7. Oct 30, 2016 #6

    Drakkith

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    Time of flight certainly decreases as the max height thrown decreases, but your original question was about an object thrown in the atmosphere vs in space.
     
  8. Oct 30, 2016 #7
    Oh yes! If we consider two similar heights in the journey of an object in space and atmosphere. The one in the atmosphere will take more time, I guess, since it has to sail through air drag. Right?
     
  9. Oct 30, 2016 #8

    Drakkith

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    That's right. Air's a real drag, ain't it?!
     
  10. Oct 30, 2016 #9
  11. Oct 30, 2016 #10

    jbriggs444

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    Details matter. Is the object at rest, falling or rising? Does it have a spin? What about its horizontal velocity? What about its shape?
     
  12. Oct 30, 2016 #11

    russ_watters

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    Am I missing something here? I see no description at all about what kind of objects we're discussing and what is making them move. It matters a lot if we're talking about a bowling ball or a glider, for example.
     
  13. Oct 30, 2016 #12

    Drakkith

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    Unless the question is about throwing something with a rocket engine, I don't see how any of that matters since we're talking about vacuum vs non vacuum. Seems pretty clear cut to me.
     
  14. Oct 30, 2016 #13

    jbriggs444

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    Take, for instance, the case of a piece of [indestructible] paper hurled upward at escape velocity. It takes longer to hit ground in vacuum than in air.
     
  15. Oct 30, 2016 #14

    russ_watters

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    If you drive a golf ball or throw a paper airplane in a vacuum it will come down faster than if you do it in air.... unless it has topspin or is flying upside-down in which case it may generate negative lift and fall much faster than when either creating positive lift or thrown in a vacuum.
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2016
  16. Oct 30, 2016 #15

    Drakkith

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    I see. My mistake then. I hope I haven't led the OP astray.
     
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