Transform the periodic table of chemical elements.

Summary
Transform the periodic table of chemical elements (periodic table) into a universal way of storing and transmitting information using spectral analysis.
Summary: Transform the periodic table of chemical elements (periodic table) into a universal way of storing and transmitting information using spectral analysis.

I propose a concept in which the basis for working with information (conservation, transmission in networks) is to use spectral atomic and molecular analysis. Transform the periodic table of chemical elements (periodic table) into a universal way of storing and transmitting information using spectral analysis.

Having completed the assembly in a small physical volume (information carrier) of a set of chemical elements, information can be stored on the carrier and subsequent decryption using spectral analysis, the information is coded taking into account the chemical elements of the periodic system (Periodic Table).

For example, you can put information in a small amount of metal alloy with a specific composition and mass of various chemical elements and use spectral analysis to read the information. This method of atomic-molecular analysis of the spectrum of elements can increase the amount of information transmitted in multiplexed communication channels.

This method of transmitting information is probably not yet used in fiber optics; I have not found any examples of using this concept for storing and recording information. Compact spectral analyzers receiving data volumes about the objects of analysis can theoretically transform the periodic table of chemical elements into another type of data.

I occasionally had to work on my specialty with portable spectrographs for the analysis of materials. So the idea came about transforming the data on the display of the spectrograph into another kind of information. into a universal way of storing and transmitting information using spectral analysis.
 

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berkeman

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Welcome to the PF, Max. :smile:

Summary: This method of transmitting information is probably not yet used in fiber optics; I have not found any examples of using this concept for storing and recording information. Compact spectral analyzers receiving data volumes about the objects of analysis can theoretically transform the periodic table of chemical elements into another type of data.
There are some obvious issues with the overall idea, like many elements are not going to mix well together, and gasses won't stay in one place, etc.

But the idea of encoding information in spectra may be interesting. I don't understand what you are saying about the container -- wouldn't you want the elements/compounds to be spaced out along a strip or distributed on a 2-D surface? If they are all mixed together, then your ability to encode information would seem to be limited, no?
 

anorlunda

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Unless you could put the elements in sequence, the number of useful messages would be very limited.

Suppose you try to read a book with an analog of spectral analysis. The analysis might tell you that the book contains 1% A, .5% B, 1.1%C, .6% D, 4% E, and so on.

It would be much easier if the data was first divided into words rather than a whole book. Even so, could you write a book using only the counts of how many of each letter appear in each word without specifying the order of the letters?

2a + 2p + 1e +1r could be "appear" or "pap ear" or other anagrams. And with spectral analysis you might not even be able to say there are two letter As, but just that there are some As.
 
Thank! You all understood !!!
Container for information, this technology for portable systems.
You remember this time, quite recently in history, we used containers with technology of magnet films (cassette tape recorders ....), CDs ....
Probably all elements of the periodic system will have a place in this technology. Can gases be used to transmit data in an optical fiber (absorption and emission spectrum) in a multiplex system?
With the help of a laser, you can precisely distribute (form a layer) the atoms of chemical elements to preserve information and then apply data on the surface.
I understand that the likelihood of the appearance of impurities of other chemical elements in technology is high. Perhaps to solve this problem, it is necessary to use a filter in the stream of information transmitted with a data packet (periodically sent verification code in data packets, for example, a non-existent element of the periodic table)
 
Unless you could put the elements in sequence, the number of useful messages would be very limited.

Suppose you try to read a book with an analog of spectral analysis. The analysis might tell you that the book contains 1% A, .5% B, 1.1%C, .6% D, 4% E, and so on.

It would be much easier if the data was first divided into words rather than a whole book. Even so, could you write a book using only the counts of how many of each letter appear in each word without specifying the order of the letters?

2a + 2p + 1e +1r could be "appear" or "pap ear" or other anagrams. And with spectral analysis you might not even be able to say there are two letter As, but just that there are some As.

Our data storage and transmission technologies used to form data on magnetic tapes and CDs. We did not try to apply the transmission of multiplex data packets in an optical fiber using the technology of the spectrum of chemical elements.
 
The formula of my concept provides not only the number of chemical elements in the stream of transmitted (readable) data, it also takes into account the mass of each chemical element in the stream of reading information.
 
For example, you can place at least two chemical elements of the periodic table in the sequence (and determine the values 0 and 1 for them).
 

Borek

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Sorry, you don't make any sense to me. Sounds like an ill conceived idea based on misunderstanding of several key concepts.

You say:

you can place at least two chemical elements of the periodic table in the sequence
So, to keep elements in the sequence you need to separate them and make sure they don't react. How?
 
I'm sorry for you.
 

Klystron

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Many people share your fascination with the periodic table and how much we can learn from the relationships among elements.

On the practical side we already code data -- as you point out -- and store, read, write, transmit and receive information using electromagnetism (EM); quite rapidly compared to chemical mixing. Given your experience with spectral analysis have you looked into Photonics ? The article link contains a broad overview but the history of laser and maser development closely aligns with developments in chemistry, particularly dyes and crystallography.
 

berkeman

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You remember this time, quite recently in history, we used containers with technology of magnet films (cassette tape recorders ....), CDs ....
Yes, and we have progressed to some pretty exotic information storage technologies, especially recently. Here is a good survey of the progression of memory technologies:


Some of the more exotic research areas now have to do with optical computing and quantum computing. Have you read about those yet? There is already some work that has been done on storing information in molecular form, similar to what you seem to be thinking about:


The challenges with all of these technologies is to make the memory retention reasonably stable over time, you want high information density, and you want high-speed access to the information. You might read through those links with those goals in the back of your mind, and then tell us in more detail how your idea is better than any of those... :smile:
 

Baluncore

Science Advisor
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The time it takes to make a spectrum, and the time it takes to read it, delays the transfer of information. A spectra would require several GHz of bandwidth be stable for some time to carry and convert the information, equivalent maybe to a billion bits per spectral sample.

A real spectrum is complex and confusing with many redundant and several coincident lines. A much simpler code, such as binary, would store more information for lower cost in a lower bandwidth channel. If the same spectral bandwidth was used, the encoded information could be increased significantly again.

To understand the spectral problem. Imagine a 16 bit integer, usually transmitted as 16 bits only. If it was transmitted as a frequency it would take 65,536 cycles before the same accuracy could be achieved in estimating the frequency. Binary is 2^16 / 2^4 =4096 times faster than a spectra.

To make up the difference you must transmit 4096 spectral channels in the same channel, all at the same time. If you used real spectra it would be an inefficient mess with unused space and overlapping data, but if instead you used an FFT to convert the data in an orderly way you would have the same modulation as used now for digital TV distribution = OFDM.

Spectral methods work, just not with real chemicals or spectra.
 
Thank you my friends!
I told you enough that you would think. Please ask how you can implement this technology from specialists who have tried to comment on me here.
I have published several articles on the web, I think I will probably never see you again in my life and hear you.
 
I looked at the links to the sites, at least read what you are sending yourself.
Please me, I looked through your links to sites, did you even watch them?
Evaluate what you are trying to refute or prove.
 
I wish good luck to physicists :)
 

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