Two-headed viper found in Denmark

  • Thread starter arildno
  • Start date
In summary, A two-headed viper was found in Denmark and there was a discussion about why two-headed snakes are common and if it is a similar mutation to polydactylism in cats. It was mentioned that the belief that two-headed snakes brought good luck may have contributed to their prevalence, but it is more likely due to a random mutation.
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  • #2


Snake!
 
  • #3


Evo said:
Snake!

Badgers badgers badgers badgers badgers badgers badgers badgers
 
  • #4


Evo said:
Snake!
What? No mushroom? I reserve the right to dance haka.
 
  • #5


I wonder why two-headed snakes are so common?
 
  • #6


lisab said:
I wonder why two-headed snakes are so common?

Same reason polydactic cats are common.
 
  • #7


DaveC426913 said:
Same reason polydactic cats are common.

Because sailors believed they brought good luck?

:tongue2:
 
  • #8


lisab said:
Because sailors believed they brought good luck?

:tongue2:
Old-time sailors would keep ferrets. Even if the ferrets were unable to chase down and kill all the rats, they were able to infiltrated all the cargo, and drive the rats out in the open, where hopefully the cats could kill them. There was an old pulp mill on the Sebasticook river that kept ferrets. The ferrets did the dirty work, and cats and rat terriers took care of the clean-up.
 
  • #9


lisab said:
I wonder why two-headed snakes are so common?
Actually, they are very rare...
 
  • #10


lisab said:
Because sailors believed they brought good luck?

:tongue2:

:biggrin:

Right.

I meant because they are common mutations.

I suppose it's not quite the same. Polydactylism in cats would be passed from generation to generation. I suspect that two-headedness in snakes is not a likewise inherited trait since I imagine it has a dramatic impact on mortality before the snake can breed.
 

What is a two-headed viper?

A two-headed viper is a snake with two heads and a shared body. This is a rare phenomenon that occurs during embryonic development, resulting in conjoined twin heads on one body.

Is it common for vipers to have two heads?

No, it is not common for vipers or any other type of snake to have two heads. This is a rare occurrence that is estimated to happen in only 1 out of every 10,000 snake births.

Where was the two-headed viper found?

The two-headed viper was found in Denmark, specifically in the town of Haslev. It was discovered by a local resident who was working in their garden.

What will happen to the two-headed viper?

The two-headed viper will be taken to a wildlife center or zoo where it can be properly cared for. It is not likely to survive in the wild due to its unique condition and will need specialized care.

What does the discovery of a two-headed viper mean for science?

The discovery of a two-headed viper is a rare opportunity for scientists to study this phenomenon and learn more about the development and genetics of snakes. It can also provide insights into how these animals survive and function with two heads.

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