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Vector Equations - Concurrent Lines

  1. Sep 7, 2011 #1
    Hi,

    I have the equation to the path of two airplanes. They fly at the same height and I found the point where their paths intersect. The question says that the two planes do not collide and I have to prove so.

    What I did was:

    Airplane 1: (16 12) + t (12 -5)
    Airplane 2: (23 -5) + t (2.5 6)

    If (16 12) and (23 -5) are their starting points and the magnitude of (12 -5) (2.5 6) are their speeds I should be able to prove that they cross the intersection point at different times, thus, do not collide. My only doubt is if what I mentioned above is in fact their starting points. Are they?

    Thanks,
    Peter G.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 7, 2011 #2
    You can say they are the starting points, as that is the position at t=0. It suffices to show that the x and y coordinates of the planes are same at different times (as you must have done.)
     
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