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Vector Sum of Forces Experiment

  1. Oct 2, 2014 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    http://cgscomwww.catlin.edu/sauerb/AP12/AP12_Labs/AP12_Lab_4_Forces_files/image002.jpg [Broken]
    My experiment is like this picture found in the net. The weight in the middle is called R in my experiment, while the left one is P and the right Q.

    Now there is one question asked, the answer of which is needed to be included in the report.
    It goes like this: "the direction of ALL the resultant vector R=( l P+Q l ) must be the same. If you want the direction of the resultant vector R to be different, what should you do to the arrangement of apparatus in Figure 4? (Use your own creativity / creative thinking)"

    2. The attempt at a solution
    Is the direction of the resultant vector R the same as the gravity which is downwards? Then how can we change it?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 7, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 2, 2014 #2

    CWatters

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    Clearly you can't change the direction of gravity but the problem doesn't limit what else you can change. Have a think about gravity and what it is.
     
  4. Oct 2, 2014 #3
    OK gravity is always directed towards the centre of the earth.
     
  5. Oct 2, 2014 #4

    CWatters

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    Gravity yes. What about other forms of acceleration?
     
  6. Oct 2, 2014 #5
    There are 4 types of fundamental forces: Gravity, Electromagnetic Force, Strong Nuclear Force and Weak Nuclear Force.
    The latter two are, if I am correct, involved particularly in interactions between elementary particles.
    So Sir, do you mean electromagnetic force?

    I have thought about that but it seems to complex and sophisticated.
    Please enlighten me...:)
     
  7. Oct 2, 2014 #6

    CWatters

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    Those are forces. I said acceleration.

    The mass is currently hanging down vertically due to gravity. Can you think of a way to get it to hang at say 10 degrees to the vertical? Hint: You might not be able to do it in a confined space or for very long.
     
  8. Oct 2, 2014 #7
    Do you mean tilting the whole table, Sir?
    This is the only way I can think of...
    and it's the same as decreasing the height of one of the two fixed points (P or Q), if I am not mistaken.
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2014
  9. Oct 4, 2014 #8

    CWatters

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    I was actually thinking of putting the rig on wheels and accelerating it horizontally.
     
  10. Oct 4, 2014 #9
    Do you mean like this, Sir?
    Because I don't really understand...
     

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  11. Oct 5, 2014 #10

    CWatters

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    No I mean put the whole rig on wheels and accelerate it across the lab like this..
    Untitled.png
     
  12. Oct 5, 2014 #11
    OH...
    Oh sorry Sir, forgive my stupidity. Yes you have solve the problem!!! Since day 1...
    Thank you Sir CWatters for accompanying me this whole week. I appreciate it. :k

    Though in the end, I still can't figure it out myself...
     
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