What are the correcting words for matrices with equal integral entries?

In summary, the conversation discusses the correction of a phrase in a research article on algebraic systems. The article focuses on the set of 2x2 matrices with equal positive integral entries, denoted by $S$, and the set of 2x2 matrices with equal integral entries, denoted by $T$. The original post asks for the correct phrase to use in the bolded section, which was then corrected in the response. The conversation also mentions the use of theorems to assist in factoring the elements of the sets and suggests further investigation into similar theorems for larger matrices.
  • #1
cbarker1
Gold Member
MHB
346
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Dear Everyone,

I am trying to figure what is the correct phrase in the bolden phrase. The article, where I am doing my research on, states: Let S be the set of all 2x2 matrices with equal positive integral entries. Let T be the set of all 2x2 matrices with equal integral entries. My professors are getting frustrated due to the circle effect that I am making the same error over many times. So what is the correcting words that fixed? Is it "having" or other words.

Beginning:

Different algebraic systems raise many questions. For instance, can the elements in a given system always be factored into primes? If so, what theorems can help factoring the elements? Are the factors unique? The poster will discuss the answers to these questions through examples and theorems for a class of $2\times2$ matrices with equal integers entries.
Let $S$ be the set of all $2\times2$ matrices with equal positive integers entries.

Conclusion:
The elements of the set $T$ can always be factored; however, most of the elements in the set $T$ are not uniquely factorable. There are theorems that can assist in determining the factorization of elements of $T$. Future investigation might include studying whether there are similar theorems for each class of $n\times n$ matrices with equal integers entries.
Thanks,
Cbarker1
 
Last edited:
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  • #2
Re: writing a correction phrase in a poster

Dear Fellow Members,

I am trying to figure out how to correct the bold phrases below. The article on which I am doing my research states: Let $S$ be the set of all 2x2 matrices with equal positive integral entries and let $T$ be the set of all 2x2 matrices with equal integral entries. My professors are getting frustrated due to the circular effect that I am creating. I am making the same error many times. So how do I fix these? Do I use "having" or another word?

Beginning:

Different algebraic systems raise many questions. For instance, can the elements in a given system always be factored into primes? If so, what theorems can help factor the elements? Are the factors unique? The poster will discuss the answers to these questions through examples and theorems for a class of 2x2 matrices with equal integer entries.

Let $S$ be the set of all 2x2 matrices with equal positive integer entries.

Conclusion:
The elements of the set $T$ can always be factored; however, most of the elements in the set $T$ are not uniquely factorisable. There are theorems that can assist in determining the factorisation of the elements of $T$. Future investigation might include studying whether there are similar theorems for each class of nxn matrices with equal integer entries.

Hi CBarker1.

Above is a corrected version of the material in your original post. Compare the two and ask questions about anything you need clarification on.
 

Related to What are the correcting words for matrices with equal integral entries?

1. What is a correction phrase?

A correction phrase is a statement or phrase used to correct or clarify a previous statement or information. It is often used in scientific writing to acknowledge and correct any errors or misunderstandings.

2. When should I use a correction phrase?

A correction phrase should be used whenever there is a mistake, inaccuracy, or ambiguity in your writing that needs to be addressed. It is important to use a correction phrase as soon as you become aware of the error to prevent any further confusion or misunderstanding.

3. How do I write a correction phrase?

To write a correction phrase, start by acknowledging the mistake or error that needs to be corrected. Then, provide the correct information or clarification. It is important to be clear, concise, and professional when writing a correction phrase.

4. Can I use a correction phrase in any type of writing?

Yes, a correction phrase can be used in any type of writing where there is a need to correct or clarify information. This includes scientific writing, research papers, reports, and even casual writing like emails or social media posts.

5. Is it necessary to use a correction phrase?

Yes, it is important to use a correction phrase whenever there is a mistake or error in your writing. This not only helps to maintain the accuracy and credibility of your work, but it also shows professionalism and attention to detail.

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