Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

What blue collar trade requires the most academic knowledge?

  1. Apr 16, 2016 #1
    I'm curious about what blue collar trade requires the most academic knowledge to perform in a competent manner. I'm not asking what blue collar trade requires the most knowledge or skill to perform competently. I'm asking about academic knowledge only. Both HVAC technicians and electricians have to be capable at using arithmetic and algebra to perform competently. For instance, frequently HVAC technicians and electricians deal with three traits on an electrical system: Voltage (V), current (I), and power (P). Power= Voltage X Current -- Often, HVAC technicians and electricians will know two of the three variable, and then the HVAC technicians and electricians will have to solve for the third variable by isolating it and dividing (or multiplying) both sides by the same thing. This is a linear equation type of algebraic equation. This is what people learn in Algebra 1.

    Automobile mechanics need to know the physics principle that liquids cannot be compressed. Understanding this principle of physics is vital to understanding hydraulic brake systems. I believe the principle is called something like Pascal's Law.


    I know other blue collar trades use academic knowledge as well. By academic knowledge, I mean strictly academic subjects such as English, mathematics, and science as opposed to technical knowledge.

    Possible blue collar trades as answers to the question of this thread include but are not limited to the following: automobile mechanic, plumber, HVAC technician, aircraft mechanic, and machinist.

    In what blue collar trade does a person have to know the most academic knowledge to perform the work of that blue collar trade in a competent manner?

    Please elaborate on why you think that the blue collar trade that you mention requires the most academic knowledge.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2016
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 16, 2016 #2

    russ_watters

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Define "blue collar trade".
     
  4. Apr 16, 2016 #3

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Please show us what your research shows and please answer Russ's questions.

    Members, please no replies until we get this thread under control. Thank you.
     
  5. Apr 16, 2016 #4
    I'm surprised that you people don't know the meaning of a blue collar trade. The following is a link to Merriam Webster dictionary's definition of blue collar: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/blue collar

    Evo, I've pretty much already said the extent of my knowledge on this. I am the person asking the question, not the person answering the question! I don't understand why you would ask me to provide citations to my research on this matter as I am not really making any assertions here. I didn't make this thread to provide information. I made this thread to learn information.
     
  6. Apr 16, 2016 #5

    russ_watters

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    I know the term, but I don't know how clear-cut the definition is.
    Here's that definition: "requiring physical work : relating to or having jobs that require physical work"

    How much physical work? Any? Predominantly? I think it would be very difficult to draw a line to separate "blue collar" from "white collar".
     
  7. Apr 16, 2016 #6

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Surely there is some information that you could find on this subject if you tried as a starting point. It is unfair to expect our members to do everything to research this from the ground up. We aren't here to teach, we are here to answer well informed questions.
     
  8. Apr 16, 2016 #7
    Russ, okay, if you are having difficulty with understanding what a blue collar trade is, I will just give you a list of blue collar trades. Please just give you opinion on which of the blue collar trades I give you requires the most academic knowledge.

    Here is my list of some blue collar trades: automobile mechanic, plumber, electrician, HVAC technician, machinist, aircraft mechanic, and welder.
     
  9. Apr 16, 2016 #8

    phinds

    User Avatar
    Gold Member
    2016 Award

    But without having done any research it sounds like you are saying "Here is an ill-defined area where I lack knowledge. Please provide it for me, so that I won't have to do any research on my own." That may not be your intent but it's what it sounds like and that doesn't go over well here on PF.

    EDIT: I see Evo beat me to it.
     
  10. Apr 16, 2016 #9
    Evo, I don't want anyone here to do any research at all to answer my question. I am just asking people to give me their opinions on what blue collar job requires the most academic knowledge.
     
  11. Apr 16, 2016 #10
    Why are you people being so hostile? I just asked people to give their opinions on what blue collar trade requires the most academic knowledge. I'm not asking anyone to do any research.
     
  12. Apr 16, 2016 #11
    Isn't that a definition of the one of the main purposes for this message board and the purpose of most of the posts here?
     
  13. Apr 16, 2016 #12

    phinds

    User Avatar
    Gold Member
    2016 Award

    This is an excellent example of why this is such a vague question, really. Do you have any concept of the complexity of modern aircraft and the amount of knowledge required to do that job? I don't think aircraft mechanic fits well with a "manual labor" description because they have to know a LOT more these days than how to wield a monkey wrench.

    One trade that occurs to me as a likely candidate is general contractor. I've got a guy who does a lot of different work for me and he knows a large range of subject that include at least a modest amount of technical information that is equivalent to academic information in terms of having to study to get it.
     
  14. Apr 16, 2016 #13

    russ_watters

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    This isn't hostility, it is trying to help you recognize and deal with what is a fairly ill-formed and thin question. The answer to the question is essentially exactly where you would choose to draw the line between "blue collar" and "white collar".
     
  15. Apr 16, 2016 #14

    phinds

    User Avatar
    Gold Member
    2016 Award

    No it is not. As Evo said, we aren't here to teach, we are here to answer well informed questions. This means questions that show some attempt on the questioner's part to have already found the answer and is stuck in a particular part or needs specific additional information
     
  16. Apr 16, 2016 #15
    You people are responding in the way that I would respond if someone asked the same question I asked but also asked for references for all his information.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    I thought maybe we had some Jack-of-all-trades types of people here who could give me interesting information without doing any research.
     
  17. Apr 16, 2016 #16

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    What type of information do you expect from people that consider themselves "jack of all trades"? What exactly are you looking for?

    If Ed works in sanitation, what would you expect him to say?
     
  18. Apr 17, 2016 #17

    strangerep

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    Gotta say, I'm kinda sympathetic to @bluemoonKY. But it's unlikely that a forum with (mostly, presumably,) white-collar members would be able to answer the original question to the extent desired. A bit like asking Sam Eagle how to snorkel.

    I have some experience with both blue and white collar jobs -- though I often wore a blue-collared shirt when performing a traditionally white-collar job. :oldwink:

    I'd have said that something like an electronics technician needs a reasonable academic background. A (good) builder benefits from some understanding of structural engineering. Then there's nursing: would you consider that blue- or white-collar? Or maybe pink collar? :oldbiggrin:

    Some blue-collars (e.g., woodwork, metalwork) leave school at year 10 or earlier. Some go on to do industrial arts to at least year 12, or further, at a tech college. So it depends on what kind of academic knowledge you have in mind. I'm pretty sure none of the tradies who come to do work at my home have ever performed an integral, or inverted a matrix. :oldtongue:
     
  19. Apr 17, 2016 #18
    I'm thinking it would probably be an electronics tech. They guy who checks and maintains the electronics on a jet, for example, probably needs to know more than the jet mechanic.
     
  20. Apr 17, 2016 #19

    russ_watters

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Good example. A nurse is on his/er feet all day and a lot of the work is with the hands. I don't know what to call it. Of course, we'd have the same issue classifying a doctor: Is a surgeon a repair technician?
     
  21. Apr 17, 2016 #20

    Vanadium 50

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor

    These sorts of threads go nowhere.

    "How about X?" "No, that's not really blue collar?"
    "How about Y?" "That's blue collar, but it's not really academic knowledge."

    They go on in circles because the question is not well-posed.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted



Similar Discussions: What blue collar trade requires the most academic knowledge?
  1. What is knowledge? (Replies: 1)

Loading...