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Engineering What is Mechanical engineering techonology?

  1. Oct 13, 2011 #1
    I'm currently a Mechanical engineering major in my junior year. My current GPA through my sophomore year is 2.75 (2.4 for Major) (yeah my humanities are keeping me afloat..hmm). I was thinking of switching to Economics or Business but i just dont think i'd enjoy those either.
    I found that there was something called Engineering technologies, can ANYONE tell me what it is? how hard/ what you do in it? All i've found on the internet is that when a machine that a real engineer designs breaks down, its the technicians job to fix it. So, is it really just a real engineers hermit? Can i use engineering technology in the finance world?
    The real reason i got into Mechanical engineering was that 1st, it has a high starting salary, 2nd, almost guranteed a jobs after graduation. (yes i know, for all the wrong reasons) i didnt even enjoy AP physics when i took it in High School, somewhat enjoyed calculus. I understand that i went into Engineering for all the wrong reasons, but everyone i asked in high school (including parents and academic advisors) said the same reasons. Im trying to right a wrong so please help me.
    What is Mechanical engineering technology? and can I use it in a Finance world?
    Thanks for all/any help!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 13, 2011 #2

    lisab

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    Re: What the F@#$ is Mechanical engineering techonology?

    My understanding of MET is that it's more practical and applied than ME, and that the work is more hands-on.

    If you want to switch from ME to finance, it seems to me taking an MET path would lead you in the wrong direction.
     
  4. Oct 13, 2011 #3

    Astronuc

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    Re: What the F@#$ is Mechanical engineering techonology?

    I believe Mechanical (or Manufacturing) Engineering Techology is more like process, control and instrumentation engineering for manufacturing, and it could include foundry/casting engineering/technology, welding, . . . . A lot of manufacturing systems use conveyor type systems (e.g., assembly lines), and someone has to lay out and build the systems used to make components and products.

    An assembly line might include various metallurgical (alloy development, melting, casting, . . . ) or chemical steps, various kinds of machining operations, heat treatment (annealing, sintering, . . . ), cleaning, measurement/metrology steps, and QC/QQ steps. Nowadays, many steps are logged into a computer network, in addition to having a cardboard traveler signed off.
     
  5. Oct 13, 2011 #4
    Re: What the F@#$ is Mechanical engineering techonology?

    Seems like i wouldnt be able to use MET in finance...darn, hate it when i get myself excited about something working out only for it to fail
     
  6. Oct 14, 2011 #5

    Astronuc

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    Re: What the F@#$ is Mechanical engineering techonology?

    Not necessarily. If one understands manufacturing (the process) and finance, then one could develop a niche as financial expert in the manufacturing sector, or once could work for a consulting company like McKinsey & Co, or investment/commercial bank, or auditing firm like Ernst & Young or KPMG. Or start one's own boutique.
     
  7. Oct 14, 2011 #6
    Re: What the F@#$ is Mechanical engineering techonology?

    So i could do a double major in MET and Finance? would that be a worth while degree combination?
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2011
  8. Oct 14, 2011 #7

    Astronuc

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    Re: What the F@#$ is Mechanical engineering techonology?

    Probably. Actually majoring in MET and business/finance would be a reasonably good combination. Financial companies need technically savvy people, and technical people (engineers and scientists) need savvy financial advisors.
     
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