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What is "Strong Force"?

  1. Feb 2, 2015 #1
    Please explain how is exactly strong force caused, I've come across various answers but haven't yet received a complete answer. What is the nature of the strong force?
    P.S: If this is the wrong thread, Please RE-LOCATE and do not remove please. :)
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 2, 2015 #2

    mfb

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    Physics cannot describe "how" or "why" on a fundamental level. Physics just can give a description that allows to predict measurement results, bi
     
  4. Feb 2, 2015 #3
    This means there's no explanation for how gravity and weak force are caused too?
     
  5. Feb 2, 2015 #4

    mfb

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    Yes. And there is no scientific way such an explanation could look like on a fundamental level.
    You can say "gravity is caused by spacetime curvature" (using gravity as an example), but then you can ask "why do we have spacetime curvature?". "The strong force is caused by gluons" - "why do gluons exist?" - just an observation, it is perfectly possible to imagine a universe without the strong force (or with something completely different), this just does not happen to be the universe we live in.
     
  6. Feb 2, 2015 #5
    Is this due to the fact that Fundamental Physics is built up on Imaginary Models and Experimentation?
     
  7. Feb 2, 2015 #6
    BTW, Could you explain how the gluons generate this strong force (leaving the formation of sub-atomic particles by the gluons aside).
     
  8. Feb 2, 2015 #7

    mfb

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    What are "imaginary models"? All of physics is built on experiments. Experiments are the only way to learn something about our universe. Models are made based on those experiments, to predict the results of more experiments.
    Quantum chromodynamics describes the details, the Wikipedia article gives an overview.
     
  9. Feb 2, 2015 #8
    I just meant to say that these models have not been seen, just been formulated from results of experiments, and you know what the common perception( Seeing is Believing) is. Thanks a hundred times for that link.. :)
     
  10. Feb 2, 2015 #9

    Orodruin

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    What do you mean by a model being "seen"? How do you "see" gravity? Models in science make predictions and these predictions are then tested against what we can observe about how the Universe behaves. A model can never been proven, but it can be discarded if it fails to make correct predictions. Naturally, the first step when making a model is to make sure it is consistent with things already observed. It can then be used to make further predictions that may make us discard it if it is not fulfilled or let it live another day if the observation is compatible with the model.
     
  11. Feb 2, 2015 #10

    ChrisVer

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    Well, but for quarks and gluons we have been able to "see" leptons and photons... and hadrons and mesons...
     
  12. Feb 2, 2015 #11

    Vanadium 50

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    Nobody has ever seen wind either - just its results. That isn't a very good reason to disbelieve wind.
     
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