Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

What is the metal(s) used in photoelectric experiments?

  1. Jun 1, 2005 #1
    My question is simple: What is the metal(s) used in photoelectric experiments?

    Textbooks just put a tiny metal foil. Any answer would be appreciated. Thnx.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 1, 2005 #2

    dextercioby

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Any metal...?Depends also on the radiation used,because the work differs from metal to metal,but it's in the "eV" range.

    Daniel.
     
  4. Jun 1, 2005 #3
    you mean work function, right ?

    marlon
     
  5. Jun 1, 2005 #4

    dextercioby

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Left.Chirality is a convention,remember...?:tongue2:

    Daniel.
     
  6. Jun 1, 2005 #5
    you have a strange sense of humour ,dexter

    marlon, sinister
     
  7. Jun 1, 2005 #6
    Hmmm...

    What was the metals that Lenard and Millikan used in their experiments?

    I know Millikan used sodium, but it was said thathe tried using different metals.

    Also, why is it not possible to carry out the experiment with non-metals?
     
  8. Jun 1, 2005 #7

    DaveC426913

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    What makes metals 'metallic' is that they give up their electrons easily, (thus making them conductive).
     
  9. Jun 1, 2005 #8

    Gokul43201

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    With non-metals, you must also overcome the band-gap which can be several eV wide. So it would take more energetic (higher frequency) radiation...but it is possible.
     
  10. Jun 2, 2005 #9
    Any metal can be used , but the main need is that the light ray or the wave which is incident should have sufficient frequency so as to overcome the work function of the metal used.
     
  11. Jun 2, 2005 #10
    thnx for your replies, was just wondering why it isnt possible for non-metals to emit photoelectrons since it should be possible.
     
  12. Jun 2, 2005 #11

    Gokul43201

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    answered in post #8

    In fact, to emphasize this, let me add that (angle resolved) photo-electron spectroscopy has proven to be a most valuable experimental probe to study the band structure of insulators like the cuprates and the manganites.
     
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2005
  13. Jun 2, 2005 #12

    ZapperZ

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor

    Take note that just because metals are typically used in a photoelectric effect experiment doesn't mean non-metals haven't been used. The band structure of semiconductors was verified using photoemission experiments. And there has been even photoemission done on "insulators" (not band insulators though).

    Zz.
     
  14. Jun 4, 2005 #13

    Gokul43201

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    I thought XPS has been used on bandgap insulators as well.
     
  15. Jun 5, 2005 #14

    Kane O'Donnell

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    XPS works for basically any element except He, H. Obviously this is because X-rays have a hellofalot of energy. :smile:

    Kane
     
  16. Jun 5, 2005 #15

    Kane O'Donnell

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    To add to what I just said, XPS is practically just a photoelectric experiment, because all you're doing is shooting X-rays at a target made of anything and measuring the kinetic energy of the ejected photoelectrons.

    Kane
     
  17. Jun 6, 2005 #16

    ZapperZ

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor

    You're right. I should have qualified that statement by including the phrase "standard photoemission" to mean only those done within the visible range. UPS have been done on insulators as well, but mainly on Mott insulators.

    Zz.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: What is the metal(s) used in photoelectric experiments?
  1. What is <S> ? (Replies: 5)

Loading...