What is the Velocity of Air Flow between Two Interconnected Balloons?

  • Thread starter Omid Michaele
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In summary: If the balloons have different initial volumes, then when the valve is opened the bigger balloon will expand more and the smaller balloon will shrink. This change in volume will cause a flow of air through the tube.
  • #1
Omid Michaele
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Last day , when i was working on two interconnected balloons , a question was kicking my brains ! This is the explanation of the question:

First , suppose a system that composed of two spherical membranes filled with air (two balloons have different initial volumes {means that the pressure inside which balloons are different} and the air pressure is 1 a.t.m) . We connect them with hollow tube and a valve. When we open the valve , one of them shrinks and the other one expands (It depends on their pressure) . So how can we get the velocity of the flowing air between two balloons? (Consider everything but if you have reasons for not considering one of them -for example the ratio of friction in the tube- Don't consider them and just tell me the reason)

Thanks
 
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  • #2
Omid Michaele said:
Last day , when i was working on two interconnected balloons , a question was kicking my brains ! This is the explanation of the question:

First , suppose a system that composed of two spherical membranes filled with air (two balloons have different initial volumes {means that the pressure inside which balloons are different} and the air pressure is 1 a.t.m) . We connect them with hollow tube and a valve. When we open the valve , one of them shrinks and the other one expands (It depends on their pressure) . So how can we get the velocity of the flowing air between two balloons? (Consider everything but if you have reasons for not considering one of them -for example the ratio of friction in the tube- Don't consider them and just tell me the reason)

Thanks

I think this is pretty straightforward. If you know the pressures inside the two balloons you can caclulate the pressure difference on the two ends of the tube. Engineering textbooks will give you very simple equations for calculating the flow rate in simple things like tubes -- you need to know pressure difference, the dimensions of the tube and the properties of the gas you are pushing (pressure, temperature, composition). Since this is just air, you can probably find all of this online with a little googling. You will also find this kind of information from manufacturers of tubing, pumps, etc. In the old days of paper catalogs, the bigger companies would often have a little primer on this at the front of the catalog to help you design your gas-handling system.
 
  • #3
You could also use the volume changes of the balloons.
 

Related to What is the Velocity of Air Flow between Two Interconnected Balloons?

What is "The Lovely Velocity Problem"?

The Lovely Velocity Problem is a thought experiment that explores the concept of relative velocity in physics.

Who came up with "The Lovely Velocity Problem"?

The problem was first proposed by physicist Albert Einstein in his 1905 paper on the Special Theory of Relativity.

What is the main idea behind "The Lovely Velocity Problem"?

The main idea is that the laws of physics, specifically those related to motion and velocity, are the same for all observers regardless of their relative velocity to one another.

What are some real-world applications of "The Lovely Velocity Problem"?

The concept of relative velocity is essential in fields such as astronomy, aviation, and space travel. It also plays a crucial role in the development of technologies like GPS.

Why is "The Lovely Velocity Problem" important in science?

It helps us understand how motion and velocity are perceived differently by different observers and how to account for these differences in our calculations and experiments. It also forms the basis for many modern theories in physics.

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