What kind of a career path would a physics graduate have in medicine?

In summary, the conversation discussed the possibility of a physics graduate entering the field of medicine, specifically through studying radiology. It was noted that in North America, this would require completing an undergraduate degree with specific prerequisite courses, with no guarantee of admission to medical school. Additionally, the field of medical physics was mentioned as a potential path for physics graduates interested in medicine. It was also mentioned that radiology is a medical specialty that requires serious instruction and experience in a residency program after receiving an MD degree. The possibility of pursuing sub-specialties in radiology was also brought up. Finally, it was acknowledged that the requirements and opportunities may differ in other parts of the world.
  • #1
hagopbul
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Hello all:

I had a debate about physics and medicine.

The topic of that debate is can a physics graduate , enter medicine by studying radiology for few years less than it requires , for normal high school students, for example 2 years

The other topic is about radiology equipment, how much time for a graduate to train and became a specialist in that domain , or it is an electrical engineering one.

Best
H.B.
 
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  • #2
There are no short cuts I'm afraid.

If you're talking about entering medicine proper (in the North American system), you need to complete an undergraduate degree with a specific set of prerequisite courses. The actual degree itself doesn't matter so long as you have those required courses. (Some schools will allow admission prior to the completion of the degree, but this is rare, even for high-achieving students.) Physics undergraduates tend to do quite well on the medical college admissions test as a group, but by no means is following this path a guarantee to admission to medical school.

Something else you might want to look into is medical physics - the specific application of physics to problems in medicine. This is a professional field, largely (~ 80%) made up of people working in radiation oncology. The route starts with an undergraduate degree in physics, then a graduate degree in medical physics (MSc and/or PhD), and then a two year accredited residency. It's a long path, but a rewarding field. More information can be found in this Insights Article.
 
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  • #3
Consider the growing field of kinesiology and its close ties to neuroscience, robotics and biomedical sensors.
 
  • #4
hagopbul said:
The topic of that debate is can a physics graduate , enter medicine by studying radiology for few years less than it requires , for normal high school students, for example 2 years

Radiology is a medical specialty and serious instruction and experience are only gained in a residency program after receiving an MD degree. Radiologist may continue with residencies into sub specialties e.g., interventional radiology or neuroradiology. Lots of work and lots of reward.
 
  • #5
Choppy said:
If you're talking about entering medicine proper (in the North American system), you need to complete an undergraduate degree with a specific set of prerequisite courses. [in order to gain admission to a medical school after that]
And of course the situation may be different in other parts of the world.
 

What are the job opportunities for a physics graduate in medicine?

As a physics graduate, you have a wide range of job opportunities in the field of medicine. You can work in research and development, medical imaging, radiation therapy, nuclear medicine, and medical device design. You can also pursue a career in medical physics, which involves using physics principles to diagnose and treat medical conditions.

Can a physics graduate work as a doctor?

Yes, a physics graduate can work as a doctor, but they must complete medical school and obtain a medical license. Physics graduates are well-suited for medical school due to their strong background in math, problem-solving, and critical thinking skills.

What skills from a physics degree are useful in the medical field?

A physics degree provides valuable skills that are transferable to the medical field. These include analytical thinking, problem-solving, data analysis, and critical thinking. Physics graduates also have a strong understanding of scientific principles and can apply them to medical research and development.

What are some examples of career paths for a physics graduate in medicine?

Some examples of career paths for a physics graduate in medicine include medical physicist, radiologist, radiation therapist, nuclear medicine technologist, and biomedical engineer. They can also work in research and development for medical devices, imaging techniques, and treatments.

Do physics graduates have an advantage in the medical field?

Yes, physics graduates have an advantage in the medical field due to their strong background in math, problem-solving, and critical thinking skills. They can also bring a unique perspective to the field by applying physics principles to medical research and development. Additionally, their skills are in high demand in the growing field of medical technology and innovation.

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