What kind of sport/exercise do you do?

  • Thread starter Sophia
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  • #26
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indeed walking is great and natural low-risk form of exercise.
:frown: But I like the risky ones. Sports in which the slightest error can send you straight to the box. Like skydiving.

I'm just kidding. I'm not a risk taker. :-p

And the ?!*@! macho teacher rode on his bike and shouted faster, faster!!! ?:)
True story .:DD
:oldlaugh: Then they shout at you: the pain is in your brain! The pain is in your brain! More power! Keep pushing through!
 
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  • #27
TheBlackAdder
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:oldlaugh: Then they shout at you: the pain is in your brain! The pain is in your brain! More power! Keep pushing through!
Because it is :)

https://www.newscientist.com/articl...how-brain-training-could-smash-world-records/ (paywall)
Summary: https://healthymemory.wordpress.com...how-brain-training-could-smash-world-records/

Up until a certain point of course. Two weeks ago I planned to run 5km, but the weather was so nice I set off to run a marathon and kept running further and further from home to make sure I had no choice to keep running to get back. I thought the endurance was purely in the brain and doing a Forrest Gump wasn't so hard physically. Apparently, when your legs don't like what you are doing they just stop working. The last 4 km my legs barely moved and it looked like I was fast walking. I ended up at home after a half marathon. Only after stopping I felt the pain in my legs. Whoops.
 
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  • #28
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Up until a certain point of course. Two weeks ago I planned to run 5km, but the weather was so nice I set off to run a marathon and kept running further and further from home to make sure I had no choice to keep running to get back. I thought the endurance was purely in the brain and doing a Forrest Gump wasn't so hard physically. Apparently, when your legs don't like what you are doing they just stop working. The last 4 km my legs barely moved and it looked like I was fast walking. I ended up at home after a half marathon. Only after stopping I felt the pain in my legs. Whoops.
Hihi. That's a lot. Once I ran so much that when I got home I fell asleep in this position. Of course with my head looking down. :olduhh:
 
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  • #29
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Hihi. That's a lot. Once I ran so much that when I got home I fell asleep in this position. Of course with my head looking down. :olduhh:
That must have been tough! How far did you run?
 
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ProfuselyQuarky
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so true! If I had to run 3 times from one goal to another I'd faint
Gah! :H I actually run around the soccer field 5 times (about a mile??) twice a week. It's during this time where I begin to feel as though I'm getting asthma :wideeyed:
Hihi. That's a lot. Once I ran so much that when I got home I fell asleep in this position. Of course with my head looking down.
Haha! I don't get sleepy after running--makes me more awake, actually, (of course, after lying down for some minutes on the grass to minimize the head throbbing). I just love to eat stuff like tangerines and strawberry lemonade afterwards, then all is well :wink::wink:
 
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That must have been tough! How far did you run?
Not really, it has been worse at other occasions. It wasn't very far. Just 10 kilometers (a little more than 6 miles).

That is really nothing. The thing here was that I ran them with a little more than 20lb(9kg) garment over me and there were lots of slopes across the road. Plus I wasn't jogging, I was running as in running.

I know it's not a lot, but to me it was a lot given the circumstances of the extra garment load and the terrain. It destroyed me, so I fell asleep without realizing it. :confused:
Haha! I don't get sleepy after running--makes me more awake, actually, (of course, after lying down for some minutes on the grass to minimize the head throbbing). I just love to eat stuff like tangerines and strawberry lemonade afterwards, then all is well :wink::wink:
Yummy. :smile:
 
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Not really, it has been worse at other occasions. It wasn't very far. Just 10 kilometers (a little more than 6 miles).

That is really nothing. The thing here was that I ran them with a little more than 20lb(9kg) garment over me and there were lots of slopes across the road. Plus I wasn't jogging, I was running as in running.

I know it's not a lot, but to me it was a lot given the circumstances of the extra garment load and the terrain.
That's a lot! You're my hero. Why did you do that?
 
  • #34
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I edited my post.
That's a lot! You're my hero. Why did you do that?
I really don't want to sound like Forrest Gump, but my answer to that question is: I don't know. :DD I just wanted to run. :confused: Maybe to test my limits? :confused:
:))
It's not really that much (for me yes with the load, but for other people that's nothing). Athletes do a whole lot more distance without breaking a sweat. I get amazed with them. :smile:
 
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  • #35
TheBlackAdder
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The thing here was that I ran them with a little more than 20lb(9kg) garment over me and there were lots of slopes across the road.
9kg is a very heavy load. During my firefighter training period we had to run and do exercises with a full compressed air tank which ranged in weight from ~8 to max 18 kg depending on whether it was carbon or steel. Running with weights is hell and probably not so good for the joints to be honest. Still, kudos.
 
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9kg is a very heavy load. During my firefighter training period we had to run and do exercises with a full compressed air tank which ranged in weight from ~8 to max 18 kg depending on whether it was carbon or steel. Running with weights is hell and probably not so good for the joints to be honest. Still, kudos.
:)) Wow, that's a lot of weight. 18kg?! I don't think I can move normally with that. :confused:
 
  • #37
TheBlackAdder
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Everyone could, the trick is letting the cylinder rest on your hips and not your shoulders. If your tank starts hanging from your shoulders you won't have a good time.
 
  • #38
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Currently I'm running 14-18 miles a week anywhere from a 6-8 mile/hour pace. I do weightlifting 5-6 times a week in 1 hour sessions. The weightlifting includes bodybuilding, power lifting(new to me, but it was a 55 year old man that taught me with the correct form it's quite safe), CrossFit, and all things hardcore cardio.
 
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Currently I'm running 14-18 miles a week anywhere from a 6-8 mile/hour pace. I do weightlifting 5-6 times a week in 1 hour sessions. The weightlifting includes bodybuilding, power lifting(new to me, but it was a 55 year old man that taught me with the correct form it's quite safe), CrossFit, and all things hardcore cardio.
That's something! :))
 
  • #40
Choppy
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I get out onto the judo mat once a week or so and try to keep up with the competitive kids. If you're not familiar with it, judo is like yoga... that you do to the other guy.:biggrin:

I've been running more lately too currently doing about 14 km with hills at a sub 6:00 min/km pace - which is huge for me. I've never been much of a runner, but my wife is.

I also fit in two strength-focussed workouts per week, either pure weights or P90X3.
 
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