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What to upgrade on my bike

  1. Aug 1, 2005 #1
    Hey guys, thanks for all the help with fixing my bike, I still haven't got rid of the clicking because I haven't bought a crank puller yet, but I'll get to it soon.
    I thought since I was getting into the whole bike fixing mood that I might want to start upgrading things. here is my bike. What do you guys think would be a good thing to start with. I personally am interested in putting on some new, hybrid tires (the ones with mountain bike treads on the sides but a smooth ~.5" strip down the middle) so i would get a bit faster ride.
    Anything else you think should be replaced just shout 'em out. I wan't to know what you think.

    Thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 1, 2005 #2
    What kind of riding are you going to be doing? If you are going to be commuting, Sheldon Brown is a good resource for bike-modification tips.
    http://www.sheldonbrown.com
     
  4. Aug 1, 2005 #3

    arildno

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    Now, I don't know a lot about bicycles, but here's a few tips:
    1. The most important things about a bicycle are the two WHEELS.
    If your bicycle hasn't got any wheels, you can't use it!
    So make sure you've got two wheels.
    Note:
    If it has 3, you write very good English for a 4-year old

    2. You should also have a SEAT where your butt can rest during cycling.
    Believe me, it is very painful to cycle without a seat, not at all pleasurable!

    3. You also need a steeering mechanism, but that is rather too advanced for me to give good advice about.
     
  5. Aug 1, 2005 #4

    DocToxyn

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    Heh-heh!
    Not many 4-year olds can afford, let alone ride, this $3300 beauty from Greenspeed.
    [​IMG]
     
  6. Aug 1, 2005 #5

    arildno

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    :rofl:
    I stand corrected.
    A very nice male design, BTW..
     
  7. Aug 1, 2005 #6

    DocToxyn

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    If you do a lot of road riding, then a pair of slicker tires could serve you well. You'll get better (lower) rolling resistance and less road noise. It's an easy and cheap switch and you can always go back to the knobbies if you want to go off-road on the weekends. As far as other upgrades, if you want to be a "weight weenie" you can always get lighter components and swap them out for your current set-up. This can get expensive though and you are typically taking about gram differences. You'll also probably see better performance from the more expensive aftermarket parts, but again unless you really feel for it, it's can be subtle. You might be better off investing in some good tools and such to maintain what you have and learn about the mechanics and repair side with this bike, then spend the bucks on a new high-end machine at some later point.

    Hitssquad's reccomendation of Sheldon is spot-on, he's a great source to go to for a lot of bike related issues.
     
  8. Aug 1, 2005 #7
    I will be riding around campus for the most part. lots of pavement. but there are some gravel trails that I'll be on. I don't ride fairly hard for a mostly street rider. I like going over little bumps and curbs and stuff. I'll try and get airborn off just about any little speed bump or hill I encounter. But I don't any actual jumping off of big jumps specifically made for bike jumping. So what tires would you guys reccomend?
     
  9. Aug 1, 2005 #8

    DocToxyn

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    I like Nashbar for most of my bike stuff, they've got a good selection and price range, never had problems with them. Sign up for the catalog and drool over all the choices. Check out this tire(you want the 26). Pump it up for the road and let out some air for off road, it should cover most of the riding you mentioned. Other shops I have experience with are Performance and Supergo. Of course if you have a local bike shop you prefer to work with, they may have these or similar tires in stock or can order/suggest tires for you to try.
     
  10. Aug 1, 2005 #9
    that tire you linked to is exactly what I am looking for. To clarify, that price is for one tire right? not the pair? also, when is says tire, that means just the rubber outside part right? not the rim or tube or spokes, because I don't need those.
    Thanks DOC

    edit: is that in america funds? because I am in canada. :smile:
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2005
  11. Aug 1, 2005 #10

    DocToxyn

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    Yes, that would be for one tire, no tubes, rim, etc. The tubes you already have should work fine with the new tire, but you might consider getting one or two new ones just to have on hand in case of a flat. They are cheap and easier/more reliable than a patch kit, you probably have schrader valves rather than presta. The photos should point out the difference, but schraders are more like what you find on your car. Yes, those are american dollars, not sure about the conversion, give 'em a call, I'm sure that do it.
     
  12. Aug 1, 2005 #11
    actually I have presta valves, and they are really annoying because I only have one little hand pump that can inflate them. all the others we have don't work on that type, plus I can't pump up my tires at a car pump. I might just get new tubes that have shrader valves.
    I think I will buy those tire though.
     
  13. Aug 1, 2005 #12

    DocToxyn

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    You should check to see if your rims can take a schrader valve. They may not be cut to accept it, or you may have to remove a screw-in type adaptor. However, I think this may solve your problem altogether, and it's cheap too.
     
  14. Aug 1, 2005 #13
    ah nashbar. you're like santa claus for bike people
    Thanks doc
     
  15. Aug 3, 2005 #14
    ok, I didn't get those ones. but I got 2 tires and a valve adaptor for $30 CDN at a local shop. I figured that rubber is rubber so tires can't differ in quality too much.
    I am having a bit of trouble though, putting these tires on. I am currently working on the front tire, because I if I do my back tire now, i should clean all the gears and stuff and I don't have time for that now. anyways, I got the front tire off with the pry tool (my dad had it) but I can't seem to figure out how to get the new tire onto the rim. Do I put the tube in the tire first, or try and get the tire around the rim and then shove the tube in? or neither?

    also, one more question, is that plastic plate between the gears and spokes of the back tire of any importance at all? or is it just a mud guard type thing? I would prefer to take it off if it's not necesary(extra weight, you know)

    thanks
     
  16. Aug 3, 2005 #15

    wolram

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    Get the bead of the tyer onto the rim, use washing liquid to make it slipery,
    then insert the inner tube pump enough air into the tube to make it form, leave the valve loose, then work the other bead of the tyer over the rim, pro's do not need leavers, but it is easy after a
    while, if you use a leaver be extra careful not to pinch the inner tube, when the tyer is on inflate the tube, then tighten the valve.
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2005
  17. Aug 3, 2005 #16

    brewnog

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    If you do want to go down the weight-reducing aisle, you should think about the 'unsprung' weight first (assuming the frame is staying put!), - tyres and rims, then spokes and hubs. Taking 500g off your wheels will be a LOT more noticable than taking 500g from anything on the frame.

    That's the ticket. Extra hint - start at the valve and work round. Never needed to use washing up liquid or tyre levers myself, but have caught my thumb between the bead and the rim once or twice! Mmm, blood blisters!
     
  18. Aug 3, 2005 #17
    ok, got the tires on, but I think they might actually be heavier, just feeling the two in my hands, but it's hard to tell. oh well, they are smoother, so that make a difference.
     
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