What would be a real-life example of the ideal gas law?

  • #1

Homework Statement


What is a real-life example of the ideal gas law?

Homework Equations


PV = nRT
(Pressure x volume = number of moles x the gas constant x temperature in Kelvin)

The Attempt at a Solution


https://www.reference.com/science/ideal-gas-law-used-everyday-life-3dacbd6ebd3b5949
Mechanics of an airbag. As airbag expands, they fill with the right kinds of gases and inflates properly and are filled with nitrogen gas. The nitrogen gas is produced by a reaction with sodium azide, this reaction causes nitrogen gas and sodium metal. While nitrogen is filling the airbag, sodium metal is reacting with potassium nitrate, and this reaction neutralizes the sodium. This helps because it makes enough gas so the airbag doesn't overfill, but does inflate (enough). As we know, the airbag protects the passenger's head in the event of a car crash.
 

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  • #2
kuruman
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Is there a question here?
 
  • #3
SammyS
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Homework Statement


What is a real-life example of the ideal gas law?

Homework Equations


PV = nRT
(Pressure x volume = number of moles x the gas constant x temperature in Kelvin)

The Attempt at a Solution


https://www.reference.com/science/ideal-gas-law-used-everyday-life-3dacbd6ebd3b5949
Mechanics of an airbag. As airbag expands, they fill with the right kinds of gases and inflates properly and are filled with nitrogen gas. The nitrogen gas is produced by a reaction with sodium azide, this reaction causes nitrogen gas and sodium metal. While nitrogen is filling the airbag, sodium metal is reacting with potassium nitrate, and this reaction neutralizes the sodium. This helps because it makes enough gas so the airbag doesn't overfill, but does inflate (enough). As we know, the airbag protects the passenger's head in the event of a car crash.
Hello @Lolaamaigatti04 !
:welcome:
(By the way: There's no subscript needed for the n in the ideal gas Law equation: PV = nRT .)

You appear to have quoted an excerpt from a Web site called "Reference". That's kind of a strange name for this site considering I could not find any references for the sources of the few articles I looked at there. No author listed for the one you quote nor from one other I looked at.


Here's an image from the first part of the article - a part you didn't quote from.
upload_2019-1-24_15-49-23.png
 

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  • #4
Thanks for the tip! (about the subscript) Yes, that is a strange name. Also, I didn't directly quote the passage. :sorry:
 

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