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What's your area and level of expertise?

  1. Jul 8, 2005 #1

    Moonbear

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    We've recently gotten a number of biologists on board here, so I thought it would be a good time to do a quick survey to find out what areas of expertise/interest we have here and what levels of training folks have. Mainly I'm asking because I do know some of the areas folks are working in, and we seem to have folks who can answer quite a lot of the questions on animals and microorganisms, but I haven't seen any plant biologists around (there's a question just sitting a few threads down that requires some knowledge of plant biology, and I don't see anyone jumping in with an answer).

    So, I'd like to hear from those who are past their bachelor's degree in a field of biology (whether you're a grad student, post-doc, Ph.D., working in industry, M.D, etc.) Those of you who are still students, feel free to share your interests of what you'd like to do with your biology degree as well, if you know yet.

    Okay, I'll start:
    I have a Ph.D. in Animal Sciences, with a research emphasis on reproductive physiology, endocrinology and behavior. My post-doctoral work provided me with more experience in reproductive endocrinology and neuroendocrinology. I'm currently research faculty at a medical school working in neuroscience where I'm using neuroendocrine and neuroanatomical approaches to understanding the regulation of the female reproductive system at a cellular and molecular level. I also taught general biology for several years, so am familiar with the pedagogy of such courses.

    (Feel free to be more or less detailed as suits your comfort level.)
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 9, 2005 #2
    I have a PhD in neuroscience, with an emphasis on systems neuroscience particularly eye movements. Currently researching in this field (on a 2 year contract).
     
  4. Jul 9, 2005 #3

    Moonbear

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    gerben, I had no idea you were also in neuroscience! We seem to have quite a neuroscience emphasis around here! :smile:
     
  5. Jul 9, 2005 #4
    Well, I'm an adult working in biological sciences (sporadically, currently home with kids.) - Physiology scares the cr*p out of me, Moonbear, :eek: I prefer cellular biology :!!) to organismal biology. Um - the reason I think precision in communication is so important is because without it all sorts of mis-perceptions can be perpetuated.

    I'd rather not pull out diplomas (I did anyway, when I popped by last week, by way of intro) because I think one of the nice things about the internet is precisely that people *can* just feel free to ask or say whatever their opinion is - and in a diverse forum like this it's nice to know that there are others who can give you a range of feedback, even if some of may be tangential or pedantic.

    Sorry,moonbear, skipped botany coursework and *really* wishing I hadn't, what a fascinating and historically important discipline.
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2005
  6. Jul 9, 2005 #5

    Monique

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    I've been most interested in medical-related research subjects on the level of identifying genetic factors/regulation (by molecular biology/genetics). I hope to start doing functional genomics in cancer biology or stem cell related research (I'd love to understand what goes on in a cell to rewire it).
     
  7. Jul 9, 2005 #6

    iansmith

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    I consider my self a bacteriologist with a focus on pathogenic bacteria but my BSc covered other biology field like ecology, plant biology and zoology.

    I am doing my PhD in microbiology. My research focus is on two component-regulatory systems (signal transduction) of gram-positives bacteria and their influence on stress adaptation and growth of bacteria. My MSc research was on acquisition of iron by gram-negative bacteria with a focus on siderophore-independent mechanisms. My BSc research project was about plasmid biology.
     
  8. Jul 9, 2005 #7

    Moonbear

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    Okay, I know there are more of you out there. :biggrin: I think we've been building up some real strengths in people with biology training here, and I want to know who you all are! Come out and introduce yourselves. :smile:

    (This will also help when we get more student questions; we'll know who to defer to with the most experience to answer a particular question if an in-depth answer is needed.)
     
  9. Jul 9, 2005 #8

    Evo

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    Great thread idea Moonbear!
     
  10. Jul 9, 2005 #9
    wow. You people are all old. (no offense). I'm still in bloody high school and I guess I'm leaning a lot more towards a career in Biology more than anything. So thats about it. It might change later on. Can't really say for certain yet.
     
  11. Jul 9, 2005 #10

    Moonbear

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    LOL! No offense taken. I didn't gear my question much toward the high school and college crowd, so there will be a lot of us "old-timers" answering here. :wink: A lot of things change between high school and starting a career, so don't worry about being uncertain yet.
     
  12. Jul 9, 2005 #11
    I love biology and its nice to see how many experts we got on here...all this knowledge.
     
  13. Jul 10, 2005 #12

    Monique

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    Old!? :tongue2:
     
  14. Jul 10, 2005 #13

    selfAdjoint

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    They're just kids! (BA math, minor in physics 1955).
     
  15. Jul 10, 2005 #14

    Moonbear

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    Sorry Monique, but to a high school student, we're all old. :rofl:
     
  16. Jul 10, 2005 #15

    Curious3141

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    I'm a medical doctor doing postgrad training in Clinical Microbiology.
     
  17. Jul 10, 2005 #16
    BA in biochem, minor in math, spent some time doing research in cell signaling, am now doing PhD in computational chemistry (research in biomolecular modeling).
     
  18. Jul 11, 2005 #17

    DocToxyn

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    BS in biology with a focus on ecology and animal behavior, minor in forensic science. PhD in Environmental Health and Toxicology with a focus on neurotoxicology of persistant environmental contaminants (PEC). Postdoctoral work, again with PECs, but looking at developmental effects and molecular/receptor interactions. My herpetology background stems more from my hobbies than any specific training, although I've worked with some herp experts.
     
  19. Jul 12, 2005 #18

    Moonbear

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    We've got quite a broadly based set of expertise here. This is fantastic! Anyone else lurking out there? I haven't seen Adrenaline in ages, but I know she's also an M.D., but I'm not sure of her specialty.
     
  20. Jul 12, 2005 #19
    quetzacoatl: do you use 3D graphics/engines in your study in computational chemistry? Or is it all numerical stuff?
     
  21. Jul 15, 2005 #20

    adrenaline

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    General Internal Medicine, but I get consulted for most of the acute critical care (ICU, CCU postoperative complicated surgical patients). This is where I do my clinical preceptorship with medical students every three months when I get assigned to ward duty for MCG medical school. I also have a side clinic specializing in athletes with Internal Medicine issues (those with type 1.5 or type I diabetes, hemachromatosis, autoimmune diseases etc.) and I workwith managing their complex medical problems so that they can function at peak level with their athleticism. Because I race mountain bikes, I do see a disproportionate amount of CAT III and above road bike racers and semi pro mountain bikers (I see a lot of college athletes in other fields as a result). Most of them are endurance athletes since medical problems (such as dosing insulin or prednisone, biannual phlebotomies for hemachromatosis really affects these types of athletes more.) I leave non medical problems such as orthopedic problems to the sports medicine orthopedists.
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2005
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