Where to find the surface free energy value?

In summary, surface free energy is a property that measures the energy required to create new surface area in a material and describes its tendency to minimize energy by forming the smallest surface area possible. It is important because it affects the physical and chemical properties of a material's surface and can impact its performance in various applications. Surface free energy can be measured using techniques such as contact angle measurements and can vary depending on the method used and the conditions of the material's surface. The surface free energy value for a specific material can be found in literature, databases, or through experiments. It can also change with temperature, which can affect the material's surface properties and performance.
  • #1
sunnyeg
1
0
Hello,
I am working on some calculations and need to find the surface free energy value of amorphous SiO2 and MgO. will anyone please tell me where I can find those values?

Thanks a lot
 
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  • #2
In general, handbooks and reports of experimental work. Anything in the Landolt-Bornstein series?

Though, you could attempt DFT calculations of these, but anything like that will require work of a month or two.
 
  • #3
for your question! The surface free energy value of a material can typically be found in scientific literature or databases. Some common sources include research papers, textbooks, and online databases such as the NIST Chemistry WebBook or the CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics. It may also be helpful to reach out to experts in the field or consult with your colleagues or supervisor for any relevant information or resources. Additionally, some experimental techniques, such as contact angle measurements, can also be used to determine surface free energy values. I hope this helps in your calculations. Best of luck with your research!
 

Related to Where to find the surface free energy value?

1. What is surface free energy?

Surface free energy is a measure of the energy required to create new surface area in a material. It is a property that describes the tendency of a material's surface to minimize its energy by forming a surface with the least possible area.

2. Why is surface free energy important?

Surface free energy is important because it affects the physical and chemical properties of a material's surface, such as adhesion, wetting, and corrosion. It also plays a crucial role in determining the behavior of materials in various environments and can impact the performance of products or materials in engineering applications.

3. How is surface free energy measured?

Surface free energy can be measured using various techniques, such as contact angle measurements, inverse gas chromatography, and surface energy balance methods. These methods involve measuring the forces between a liquid or gas and a solid surface to calculate the surface free energy value.

4. Where can I find the surface free energy value for a specific material?

The surface free energy value for a specific material can be found in scientific literature, databases, or by performing experiments to measure it. It is important to note that the surface free energy value can vary depending on the method used for measurement and the conditions of the material's surface.

5. How does surface free energy change with temperature?

The surface free energy of a material can change with temperature due to changes in the molecular structure and intermolecular forces of the material. As temperature increases, the surface free energy can increase or decrease, depending on the material's properties. This change in surface free energy can have implications for the material's surface properties and performance.

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