Why Does Everything Stick to Your Fingers?

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In summary: , when you put pressure on the object with the finger, it changes the shape of the finger and this makes it easier for the object to stick to the finger.
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aiop
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Why does everything under a certain weight seem to stick to my fingers (or any ones finger) for a second or less then fall. For example i can pick up a pen cap for a second and lift it high into the air before it comes fall down as my finger continues into the air.

Wondering why everything does this that is under a serene weight. As well when you push down on the object it seems to stick for longer. (my fingers aren't sticky or sweaty and this seems to only work when there is a small surface area better if smaller then the total objects.)

can some one please tell me what's going on here. thanks very much.
 
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  • #2
aiop said:
Why does everything under a certain weight seem to stick to my fingers (or any ones finger) for a second or less then fall. For example i can pick up a pen cap for a second and lift it high into the air before it comes fall down as my finger continues into the air.

Wondering why everything does this that is under a serene weight. As well when you push down on the object it seems to stick for longer. (my fingers aren't sticky or sweaty and this seems to only work when there is a small surface area better if smaller then the total objects.)

can some one please tell me what's going on here. thanks very much.
I think it has to do with the fact that your finger is soft, when you press on the object, the finger change shape to envelope it, and friction can hold on the the object for a while, and the longer/harder you press, the more your finger change shape. Also, there is the Van der waal's forces that attract the object and your finger, and this effect may be magnified when pressing it longer makes the contacting area increase.
 
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24forChromium said:
I think it has to do with the fact that your finger is soft, when you press on the object, the finger change shape to envelope it, and friction can hold on the the object for a while, and the longer/harder you press, the more your finger change shape. Also, there is the Van der waal's forces that attract the object and your finger, and this effect may be magnified when pressing it longer makes the contacting area increase.
Van der waal's force may not be the reason. Gecko make use of that as their hair are nanometer scale while ours are in milimeters. Sooo
 

Related to Why Does Everything Stick to Your Fingers?

1. Why do some things stick to your fingers while others don't?

The stickiness of an object depends on its molecular structure and the surface it comes into contact with. Some objects have molecules that easily adhere to the surface of your skin, while others do not.

2. Why is it harder to remove certain substances from your fingers?

Some substances have stronger adhesive properties, making them harder to remove from your fingers. This could be due to the presence of strong chemical bonds or a larger surface area of contact.

3. How can you prevent things from sticking to your fingers?

You can prevent things from sticking to your fingers by wearing gloves or using a barrier, such as lotion or powder, on your skin. Another option is to avoid touching the object directly and use a tool or utensil instead.

4. Why do some foods seem to stick more to your fingers than others?

Foods that are high in sugar or fat tend to stick more to your fingers because these substances have adhesive properties. Additionally, some foods may have a sticky texture, making them more likely to adhere to your skin.

5. Can the temperature affect how easily things stick to your fingers?

Yes, temperature can affect how easily things stick to your fingers. Higher temperatures can soften substances, making them more likely to stick, while lower temperatures can cause substances to harden and not stick as easily.

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