Why magnetic field deflects a charged particle.?

In summary, the magnetic field deflects a charged particle due to the application of special relativity to the electrostatic field. This can be seen through a thought experiment using two infinite, straight, and parallel lines of charge. While there is no positive or negative plate in a magnetic field, this equivalence holds true in this special case.
  • #1
Aladin
77
0
Hello.
Sir My question is that:Why magnetic field deflects a charge particle or a charged particle experiences a force in a magnetic field?Ok
In electric field between two parallel plates a +ve charge particle deflects towards -ve plate when it is thrown perpandicularly.
But in magnetic field there is no any -ve or +ve plate then what thing in magnetic field deflects this charge?
thanks
 
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  • #2
fundamentally, the magnetic effect is the consequence of applying the effects of special relativity to the electrostatic field. there's a thought experiment, using two infinite, straight, and parallel lines of charge, that shows this equivalence, at least in this special case (so it's not a proof of the general case). instead of repeating myself, i have a post somewhere else that explains that special case to take a look at.
 
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  • #3


The reason why a magnetic field deflects a charged particle is due to the interaction between the magnetic field and the electric charge of the particle. When a charged particle moves through a magnetic field, it experiences a force known as the Lorentz force. This force is perpendicular to both the direction of motion of the particle and the direction of the magnetic field.

To understand this better, we need to look at the concept of magnetic fields. Magnetic fields are created by moving electric charges, such as the flow of electrons through a wire. These fields exert a force on other charged particles that enter the field. This force is always perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field and the direction of motion of the charged particle.

In the case of a charged particle moving through a magnetic field, the force exerted by the magnetic field causes the particle to change direction. This is because the force acts at a right angle to the particle's motion, causing it to curve. The amount of deflection depends on the strength of the magnetic field and the velocity of the particle.

In contrast, the electric field between two parallel plates exerts a force on charged particles that is parallel to the direction of the field. This is why a positive charge will move towards the negative plate, as it is attracted by the opposite charge.

In summary, the reason why a magnetic field deflects a charged particle is due to the interaction between the magnetic field and the electric charge of the particle, resulting in the Lorentz force. This force causes the particle to change direction and its magnitude depends on the strength of the magnetic field and the velocity of the particle.
 

1. What is a magnetic field?

A magnetic field is a force field that is created by moving electric charges. It is represented by lines of force, called magnetic field lines, which show the direction and strength of the force.

2. How does a magnetic field deflect a charged particle?

A magnetic field deflects a charged particle because the particle experiences a force, known as the Lorentz force, when it moves through the magnetic field. This force is perpendicular to both the direction of motion of the particle and the direction of the magnetic field, causing the particle's path to bend.

3. Why does a charged particle need to be moving to be deflected by a magnetic field?

A charged particle needs to be moving in order to be deflected by a magnetic field because the Lorentz force is dependent on both the velocity and charge of the particle. If the particle is not moving, it will not experience this force and will not be deflected.

4. What factors affect the amount of deflection of a charged particle by a magnetic field?

The amount of deflection of a charged particle by a magnetic field depends on the strength of the magnetic field, the velocity of the particle, and the magnitude of the charge on the particle. Additionally, the angle between the direction of motion of the particle and the direction of the magnetic field also plays a role in the amount of deflection.

5. Can a magnetic field completely stop a charged particle?

No, a magnetic field cannot completely stop a charged particle. The Lorentz force can only change the direction of the particle's motion, not bring it to a complete stop. To completely stop a charged particle, an opposing force, such as an electric field, is needed.

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