Why String theory has so many dimensions

  • Thread starter siphon
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I am no expert in the string theory, but I was curious why it has so many dimensions. After thinking about it, I think I know why. It has to do with the assumption of 2-D strings. This can be understood with an analogy. We can make any color using combinations of red, blue and yellow. If we plot these three on a graph we can express all the colors on one piece of paper. If instead we assume 2-D, instead of 3-D, or only use two colors at a time, we will need three plots for the three possible two-color combinations. We will also need another plot for white and neutral gray, since these can not be made with two primary colors. Then there are the tan-grays, blue-grays, red-grays, etc., each needing their own plot. The result is an escalation in the number of dimensions. Could all the extra dimensions be a mathematical necessity due to the 2-D assumption. Based on this analogy, if strings were made more 3-D, like the single string filament that is wound inside a golfball, the result should theoretically decrease needed dimensions.
 

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DaveC426913
Gold Member
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Uh well... pick up a book on the subject. It'll explain a lot.

Or Wiki http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calabi-Yau_manifold" [Broken]. There's 5 dimensions right there.
 
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