Will this centrifugal fan design work?

In summary, the conversation is about the speaker's idea for a VTOL RC craft that uses a centrifugal fan with truncated cones to direct air downwards. They have written a program to test the concept and are seeking advice and input from others. Another person in the conversation shares a similar design from a jet engine without the combustion chamber and turbine. The speaker wonders if their design would still work for flight.
  • #1
blainiac
50
2
Hello everyone.

I am working on a VTOL RC craft that I hope will work. I was planning on using a centrifugal fan to accelerate air radially (instead of a squirrel-cage design), and putting 45 degree truncated cones around it to direct it downwards. I wrote a program with many small particles accelerating outward from a 'fan', and they bounced as predicted off the shrouds. I was just wondering if you think this would work in real life.

I was thinking if the fan blades were at a pretty large distance and tall, it could move quite a bit of air. With a larger diameter, it wouldn't need to spin as quickly as a smaller unit.

I was going to build this using a chainsaw engine to move two centrifugal fans (only one is shown in the drawings), and make truncated cones from plastic. I was wondering if anybody had any advice or input for this. I was also wondering if anyone knew any useful formulas to aid in the design process.
 

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  • #3
Thank you for your reply. I read the link provided, very interesting stuff. So basically this is the initial part of a jet engine, minus the combustion chamber and turbine? I wonder if it would work well still to fly with just the 'compressor'.
 

Related to Will this centrifugal fan design work?

1. Can this centrifugal fan design handle high pressure situations?

This depends on the specific design and materials used. Generally, centrifugal fans are better suited for high pressure situations than axial fans due to their curved blades and the way they move air perpendicular to the fan's axis.

2. How efficient is this centrifugal fan design?

The efficiency of a centrifugal fan design depends on various factors such as the design, operating conditions, and materials used. Generally, centrifugal fans are more efficient than axial fans due to their ability to handle higher pressures and move air in a more efficient manner.

3. Is this centrifugal fan design suitable for use in corrosive environments?

This depends on the materials used in the fan's construction. If the materials are resistant to corrosion, then the fan design should be suitable for use in corrosive environments. It is important to consider the specific conditions and chemicals present in the environment when selecting materials for the fan.

4. How noisy is this centrifugal fan design?

The noise level of a centrifugal fan design depends on various factors such as the fan speed, design, and materials used. Generally, centrifugal fans tend to be quieter than axial fans due to the way they move air perpendicular to the fan's axis. However, the specific noise level of a fan design can vary and should be tested in a controlled environment.

5. Can this centrifugal fan design be used for both air intake and exhaust?

Yes, centrifugal fan designs can be used for both air intake and exhaust. The direction of air flow can be controlled by the orientation of the fan blades and the direction of rotation. This makes them versatile for use in various applications.

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