Wireless Electricity: Replicating MIT's Witricity on Smaller Scale

In summary, the speaker is trying to replicate MIT's "Witricity" on a smaller scale by connecting a function generator to a coil and an LED to a second coil with more loops. They have achieved a transformer and have found that the LED lights up when the coils are up to 10cm apart. They now want to increase the distance and believe they need to match the resonant frequency of the two circuits by adding capacitors and using the formula F=1/[2(pi) *sq rt(LC)], but they are unsure how to measure the inductance of each coil. They provide the measurements of the coils as the first one being 6 inches in diameter with 30 loops and the second being 5 inches
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I'm trying to replicate MIT's "Witricity", but on a smaller scale. I have a coil connected to a function generator and then a second coil (with more loops than the first) connected to an LED. So I guess now I have a transformer. And the LED lights up when the coils are up to 10cm apart. I would like to get more distance - so I think I need to match the resonant frequency of the two circuits, but I'm not sure how. I think I need to put a capacitor in each circuit and use F=1/[2(pi) *sq rt(LC)], to find the resonant frequency, but how do I measure the inductance of each coil? Thanks for any help!
 
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  • #2
Will you please describe your coils a bit more?
 
  • #3
The first coil is about 6 inches in diameter with 30 loops and the second is about 5 inches in diameter with about 40 loops.
 

1. What is wireless electricity?

Wireless electricity is the transmission of electrical energy from a power source to an electrical device without the use of physical wires or cables. It relies on the principles of electromagnetic induction and resonance to transfer energy wirelessly.

2. How does MIT's Witricity work?

MIT's Witricity uses a technology called resonant coupling, which consists of a transmitter coil and a receiver coil. The transmitter coil is connected to a power source and generates a magnetic field. The receiver coil, located near the transmitter, is tuned to the same frequency as the transmitter and can capture the energy from the magnetic field, converting it back into electricity to power the device.

3. Can wireless electricity be replicated on a smaller scale?

Yes, the principles of wireless electricity can be applied on a smaller scale. In fact, there are already smaller scale wireless charging technologies available for devices such as smartphones and electric toothbrushes. However, replicating MIT's Witricity specifically may require specialized equipment and expertise.

4. Is wireless electricity safe?

The safety of wireless electricity depends on the technology being used and its implementation. Generally, the magnetic fields used in wireless electricity are considered safe for humans. However, it is important to follow proper safety protocols and regulations when using any type of electrical technology.

5. What are the potential benefits of wireless electricity?

Wireless electricity has the potential to eliminate the need for physical wires and cables, allowing for more flexibility and convenience in powering devices. It could also reduce the use of disposable batteries and decrease the number of cords and outlets needed in homes and public spaces.

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