Wireless transmission of electricity

In summary, there is no research done in this field, but it is known that Tesla did some research on this topic. His scheme was far bigger and more 'global'than people either then (or now) would finance. Additional problems would be occasioned now by modern electronics being so sensitive to static.
  • #1
ludi_srbin
137
0
Is there any research done in this field? If there is why it was not realized by now? It is known that Tesla did some research on this topic but never got the funding for his Wardenclyffe Tower. I think that he managed to send electricity at about 40 miles without using any wires.
 
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  • #2
I think there was a thread on this and the idea is just way too dangerous to do on a usable level.
 
  • #3
The closest modern application that I've seen proposed was to use microwaves to beam energy down to Earth from orbiting solar panel farms. But there's the pesky problem of toasting everything in the beam, including birds, airplanes, etc. You can transmit power as EM waves, but when you get to useful power transfer levels, the beam is very dangerous.
 
  • #4
crystal radio

i know if you use a crystal radio close enough to the AM transmitter it doesn't require any usage of external power
how does that work?
 
  • #5
Shawnzyoo said:
i know if you use a crystal radio close enough to the AM transmitter it doesn't require any usage of external power
how does that work?
I had a crystal radio as a kid. I think I got one station pretty reliably, and sometimes hints of other stations. The metal whisker and the crystal form a rectifying diode, so if you have a reasonably resonant long-wire antenna, you can get enough of an AC voltage to power a very low power earpiece. A quarter-wave is about 75m at 1MHz, so it takes a good long wire suspended above the ground perpendicular to the line-of-sight to the transmitter to have a chance of picking up a good voltage. Man, that takes me back (to the stone age almost... :-)
 
  • #6
berkeman said:
Man, that takes me back (to the stone age almost... :-)
Me too. I was just thinking the other day about selenium rectifiers. Remember those plates?

Regards
 
  • #7
Check the Tesla web ring for details on Tesla. Not that there was no money for the project - just that there was no way of metering any usage, so no way to charge for it - so what commercial enterprise would back that? More recent attempts to replicate the work have been made by a few groups - with varying results. Teslas scheme was far bigger and more 'global'than people either then (or now) would finance. Additional problems would be occasioned now by modern electronics being so sensitive to static. Tesla was charging the Earth as one plate of a giant capacitor - with the upper atmosphere for the other plate. Transmission along these lines certainly works. My own humble attempt saw sparks being able to be drawn from the water mains for a few blocks around me.. It bugged the hell out of everyone with flouro tubes for house lighting.. they glowed constantly. Not impossible, just politically and economically devisive. Sad really. :|
 
  • #8
How exactly did you do it? :rofl: Do you need to be very good (Engineer) or is it possible for an amateur like me?
 
  • #9
As I say, check the coil builders sites for coil design info. Teslas Colorado Springs Notes is a good (but heavy going) read. Basically, a spark discharge means a 'failure'. Set things for primary resonance and "St. Elmo's Fire"or 'secondary efflueve' as it is sometimes called. Pump the input power up to about 7KVA and you'll be doing it too.
 
  • #10
In addition to the safety factors mentioned above, wireless
transmission of power is not as efficient as wired transmission. When you
sell product by the kilowatt, you lose money to the water vapor and passing birds.
 
  • #11
i think there's somebody out there trying to make an attempt on that matter. but its to dabgerous and the operation is not efficient when transmitting large amount of electric energy unwired.
 
  • #12
Only Tesla could do it.
 
  • #13
nikola-tesla said:
Only Tesla could do it.

I'm not taking anything away from the Genius Tesla. But
Wardenclyffe was a failure in my engineering judgement.
 
  • #14
What about the reverse??

I've read a fair amount about Tesla and radio waves. I've never tried to measure electricity in an antenna but if you were to setup a large enough antenna would you be able to collect a current in the antenna? If so, could you not collect the electricity in a battery from the wire?
 
Last edited:

1. How does wireless transmission of electricity work?

Wireless transmission of electricity uses electromagnetic waves, such as radio waves, to transfer energy from a power source to a receiver without the need for physical wires. This is achieved through the use of induction, where an alternating current in one coil creates a changing magnetic field, which induces a current in a nearby coil.

2. What are the advantages of wireless transmission of electricity?

Some of the advantages of wireless transmission of electricity include increased convenience, as there is no need for physical wires or charging cables, and increased safety as there is no risk of electric shock. It also allows for the transfer of energy over longer distances and through obstacles, making it useful for remote or hard-to-reach locations.

3. What are the limitations of wireless transmission of electricity?

One of the main limitations of wireless transmission of electricity is the loss of energy during the transfer process. This is due to factors such as distance, interference, and inefficiency in the conversion of energy. Another limitation is the high initial cost of implementing wireless transmission technology.

4. Is wireless transmission of electricity safe?

Yes, wireless transmission of electricity is generally considered safe. The electromagnetic waves used for transmission are non-ionizing and do not pose a health risk. However, precautions should still be taken to ensure that the technology is properly installed and used according to safety protocols.

5. What are the potential applications of wireless transmission of electricity?

Wireless transmission of electricity has the potential to revolutionize the way we power devices and buildings. It can be used for wireless charging of electronic devices, powering remote sensors and devices, and even for wireless charging of electric vehicles. It also has potential uses in industries such as healthcare, where it can power medical devices without the need for wires.

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