Work transfer - Introductory Thermodynamics

In summary, the conversation is about a problem involving a vertical cylinder with a frictionless piston that is heated, causing the piston to rise 0.5m. The cylinder contains air and the atmospheric pressure is constant. The question is asking for the work transfer to the surroundings for two different scenarios. One where the system is only the air in the cylinder, and another where the system includes the air and the piston. Some relevant equations are provided for solving the problem. However, the problem has already been solved by the time of the conversation.
  • #1
Daveami
8
0
Hi there,

Would anyone be able to help with the below problem.

Vertical cylinder, closed at the lower end, fitted with a frictionless piston of mass 200kg and cross-sectional area 0.1m^2. The cylinder contains air which is heated such that its state changes and the piston rises through o.5m. (atmospheric pressure is constant at 100KPa)

Calculate the work transfer to the surroundings if

a) the system is the air in the cylinder only.
b) the system is the air in the cylinder and the piston.

Equations:

None are given but I would think these are relevant:
Force = Pressure x Area
Work = Force x distance
Work = Integral of F dx
Work = integral of P dx

Any help would be appreciated!

Dave
 
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  • #2
Dont worry about this one, I have now solved it!
 

1. What is work transfer in introductory thermodynamics?

Work transfer in introductory thermodynamics refers to the transfer of energy from one system to another through mechanical means, such as force or motion.

2. How is work transfer related to the first law of thermodynamics?

The first law of thermodynamics states that energy cannot be created or destroyed, only transferred or converted from one form to another. Work transfer is one way in which energy can be transferred from one system to another.

3. What are some examples of work transfer in introductory thermodynamics?

Examples of work transfer in introductory thermodynamics include the work done by a piston in a car engine, the work done by a person when lifting an object, and the work done by a pump in a refrigeration system.

4. How is work transfer calculated in thermodynamics?

Work transfer can be calculated by multiplying the applied force by the distance over which the force is applied. This is represented by the equation W = F * d, where W is work, F is force, and d is distance.

5. What is the difference between work transfer and heat transfer in thermodynamics?

Work transfer involves the transfer of energy through mechanical means, while heat transfer involves the transfer of energy through temperature differences. Work transfer also results in a change in the system's internal energy, while heat transfer does not.

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