Writing CV for PhD application

In summary: So I'll just go and post the title and the authors (and the journal, of course) without any further information.In summary, the conversation discusses the question of how to present research experience in a CV for a PhD application. The participants agree that it is appropriate to list a paper that has been accepted but not yet published, with the journal name and (to be published) indicated. They also mention the importance of having a letter of recommendation from a supervisor. There is no confidentiality or etiquette issue with listing the title of a paper before publication, and it is common practice to do so. The participants also mention the use of specific phrases to indicate the stage of preparation for an article.
  • #1
maNoFchangE
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I have been engaged in some laboratory projects during my master study. But only one of them which has been written as a paper, it has been accepted but not yet published. Now I want to write a CV for my PhD application, and wondering what I should write in the research experience section. Will it not make me look like a kiddy/amateur applicant if I only write of those lab projects under the research section? If I were to wait for the paper I mentioned before to be published it will take some weeks may be, if possible I want to contact the future supervisors as soon as possible while giving them a good impression about myself.
 
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  • #2
Definitely list the paper with the journal name and put (to be published) in parantheses at the end of the citation. Post it on arXiv and include a link so they can read it.

You want to include the lab projects too. Hopefully, you'll have a letter of recommendation from a supervisor saying more about them.
 
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  • #3
Dr. Courtney said:
Definitely list the paper with the journal name and put (to be published) in parantheses at the end of the citation.
I also thought that way, but what is actually the etiquette of revealing the title of a paper before it was published? I'm concerned with the confidentiality issue, I know that in some journal the author is not allowed to post his paper in another journal before the final decision of its acceptance is issued. Besides, I'm not the main author of that paper so I'm afraid I don't have that full of permission to post it somewhere else.
 
  • #4
It is common and accepted practice to list the title, authors, and journal of a paper that has been accepted followed by (to be published). There may be exceptions for journals with strict embargos on pre-publication publicity, but I've never encountered that. If the journal does not prohibit you from listing the paper in a CV prior to publication, you are good to go.
 
  • #5
Just a note, and this may be field-specific, but I would use either the phrase "accepted for publication" or "in press" as opposed to "to be published." The latter could apply to an article at any stage of preparation whereas the former two imply that the article has been through the peer review process and the journal has accepted it. Articles that have been submitted and are currently going through the peer review process would be labelled "under review" or "submitted." Articles that are currently being prepared would be labelled "manuscript in preparation."

In general there is no confidentiality or ettiquette issue with listing the title of work that you've done prior to publication. It may be a different story if you were to post the entire article, but even that is faily common, what with the prevelance of the pre-print server these days.
 
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  • #7
Choppy said:
In general there is no confidentiality or ettiquette issue with listing the title of work that you've done prior to publication. It may be a different story if you were to post the entire article, but even that is faily common, what with the prevelance of the pre-print server these days.
Thank you Choppy, that's a relief.
 

Related to Writing CV for PhD application

1. What information should be included in a CV for a PhD application?

A CV for a PhD application should include your personal information, educational background, research experience, publications, awards and honors, relevant skills, and references.

2. How long should a CV be for a PhD application?

A CV for a PhD application should typically be 2-3 pages in length. It should be concise and focused on highlighting your most relevant experiences and achievements.

3. Should I include non-academic experiences in my CV for a PhD application?

Yes, including non-academic experiences such as internships, volunteer work, or leadership roles can demonstrate your diverse skills and interests, which can be beneficial for a PhD application.

4. Is it necessary to tailor my CV for each PhD program?

Yes, it is recommended to tailor your CV for each PhD program you are applying to. This will allow you to highlight specific experiences and skills that are relevant to the program and demonstrate your interest and fit for the program.

5. Should I include a cover letter with my CV for a PhD application?

It is not always required to include a cover letter with your CV for a PhD application, but it can be beneficial to introduce yourself and explain why you are interested in the program and how you are a good fit for it. However, make sure to follow any specific instructions provided by the program regarding cover letters.

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