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Scared to major in Physics, Chemistry or EE?

by MathGangsta
Tags: chemistry, major, physics, scared
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MathGangsta
#1
Aug11-09, 07:57 PM
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Chemistry or EE? How do they differ?
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thrill3rnit3
#2
Aug11-09, 09:53 PM
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First up, why scared to major in Physics?

Next, Chemistry and EE are totally different fields. Chemistry deals with the properties, structure, and composition of matter. Electrical engineering is the study of...electricity (duh) and electronics, as well as their applications.
Klockan3
#3
Aug12-09, 02:00 AM
P: 614
If you are scared to major in Physics then do not try an EE either because it have quite a bit of physics.

DukeofDuke
#4
Aug12-09, 11:02 AM
P: 283
Scared to major in Physics, Chemistry or EE?

You're a math gangster, physics shouldn't be so bad! All it is, really, is math+reality.
MathGangsta
#5
Aug14-09, 07:47 PM
P: 30
Scared in terms of jobs.. I wouldn't plan on doing a PhD, although maybe a Master's. From what everyone says, Physics majors do Engineering jobs. I guess I'm confused on the whole Physics Bachelor's thing. I would like to get into scientific instrumentation. Like analytical Chem, or something like that. Any suggestions? Thanks.
lisab
#6
Aug14-09, 08:24 PM
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Quote Quote by MathGangsta View Post
Scared in terms of jobs.. I wouldn't plan on doing a PhD, although maybe a Master's. From what everyone says, Physics majors do Engineering jobs. I guess I'm confused on the whole Physics Bachelor's thing. I would like to get into scientific instrumentation. Like analytical Chem, or something like that. Any suggestions? Thanks.
I think it's easier to get a job with a BS in chemistry than a BS in physics (just based on my experience). Especially if you like working with instruments, you should consider going with chemistry.

In my part of the world - Seattle - knowing environmental testing (e.g., EPA methods) is quite marketable, even in this economy.
Astronuc
#7
Aug15-09, 07:39 AM
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Quote Quote by lisab View Post
I think it's easier to get a job with a BS in chemistry than a BS in physics (just based on my experience). Especially if you like working with instruments, you should consider going with chemistry.
Certainly different markets/regions may produce different demands for particular disciplines.

MathGangsta needs to figure out what he/she wants to do professionally, then pursue an academic program that will provide the background and training to become proficient in the particular discipline.

Beside physics, chemistry or EE, there is engineering physics, chemical engineering, or a variety of other engineering disciplines, as well as the possibility of double major, or major + minor.


One has to determine what one would like to do professionally first. Otherwise, one can pick a program, go onto grad school for MS, and then hope there is a job out there.
sapphire_glow
#8
Aug15-09, 05:32 PM
P: 5
If you do engineering physics, one of the many specialties you can focus on is the engineering of new materials.

From personal experience, the work I've been doing this summer focuses on part of the scientific foundation of quantum computing (via one method), the creation of quantum dots. One of the strongest new waves in the field (as I've seen) is the attempt to harness molecules to act as these quantum dots in one's computer circuits (so a lot of the articles I've been reading lately have a strong chemistry component to them as well as electrical engineering and quantum physics).

Thus, my point is, if you do engineering physics, you can find yourself working with electrical engineering, physics, chemistry, and even computer science, a great mix if you're someone like me who likes to learn a lot about a whole lot of different, related topics.
Moonshine
#9
Aug15-09, 07:55 PM
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If you are only going to get a bachelor's degree, you will want it to be an engineering degree.
thrill3rnit3
#10
Aug15-09, 07:58 PM
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How are the prospects of an Engineering Physics major, both in terms of employment right out of college and graduate school?
Astronuc
#11
Aug16-09, 09:30 AM
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Quote Quote by thrill3rnit3 View Post
How are the prospects of an Engineering Physics major, both in terms of employment right out of college and graduate school?
From University of Saskatchewan
http://physics.usask.ca/EP_Pamphlet-2.htm
About the Graduates and Jobs
We have found that the special mix of fundamental science and practical skills that Engineering Physics graduates learn make them very employable. Graduates have found jobs in research, technology development, optics and software sectors of industry. Many of our graduates have obtained employment with universities, government laboratories and companies such as Nortel, JDS Uniphase, Corning, SED Systems, MDRobotics, Cameco, Kipp-Zonen and other local and international high technology companies. Graduates are well equipped to pursue post-graduate studies in any area of Physics or Engineering Physics should they so desire.
http://physics.usask.ca/

At University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
http://physics.illinois.edu/prospect...curriculum.asp (Compare physics with engineering physics)

EP is usually an undergrad program, but there are a few graduate programs, e.g., the one at RPI. Usually as a graduate student, one becomes highly specialized.

See RPI's options here - http://www.eng.rpi.edu/mane/
http://www.eng.rpi.edu/mane/ug_curriculum_eng_phy.cfm

So there are lots of options both academically and professionally.


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