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Ester linkage and alkene cracking

by sgstudent
Tags: alkene, cracking, ester, linkage
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sgstudent
#1
May8-12, 09:29 AM
P: 645
in an ester is the ester link/bond the -COO-? meaning does it include the C=O in the ester linkage. i would think so as something else would mean the functional group is different. However, i am not entirely sure as my textbook just brakets the C-O as the ester bond.

Also, can alkenes such as decene be cracked or only alkanes can be cracked?

Thanks for all the help!
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chemisttree
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May8-12, 10:30 PM
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Quote Quote by sgstudent View Post
in an ester is the ester link/bond the -COO-? meaning does it include the C=O in the ester linkage. i would think so as something else would mean the functional group is different. However, i am not entirely sure as my textbook just brakets the C-O as the ester bond.
There are several bonds in an ester. There is a bond between the carbonyl carbon and the adjacent carbon (R-COO), there is a double bond between the carbonyl carbon and the carbonyl oxygen (R-C=O), there is a bond between the carbonyl carbon and the adjacent oxygen (R-(C=O)-O) and there is a single bond between the adjacent singly-bonded oxygen and another carbon (R-(C=O)-O-R').
Also, can alkenes such as decene be cracked or only alkanes can be cracked?
That which is cracked is usually a heavy oil or thick, viscous residue or even a coal. So the answer is neither alkenes such as decene or alkanes are cracked. Those compounds are the products of cracking.
sgstudent
#3
May9-12, 12:26 AM
P: 645
Quote Quote by chemisttree View Post
There are several bonds in an ester. There is a bond between the carbonyl carbon and the adjacent carbon (R-COO), there is a double bond between the carbonyl carbon and the carbonyl oxygen (R-C=O), there is a bond between the carbonyl carbon and the adjacent oxygen (R-(C=O)-O) and there is a single bond between the adjacent singly-bonded oxygen and another carbon (R-(C=O)-O-R').

That which is cracked is usually a heavy oil or thick, viscous residue or even a coal. So the answer is neither alkenes such as decene or alkanes are cracked. Those compounds are the products of cracking.
Oh then if there is an alkene in the coal which is a long chain one will it be cracked? Thanks for the help!


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