An alloy of all stable metals


by Squall94
Tags: alloy, metals, stable
Squall94
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Nov18-12, 09:02 AM
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Is it possible to make an alloy with all possible stable (non-radioactive) metals? I've googled around, and I couldn't find one, and also couldn't find a reason why it hasn't been made. If its not possible, what is the reason behind it?
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Borek
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Nov18-12, 09:25 AM
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Not all metals are miscible, so there are serious limitations to the alloy composition.

Besides, just because something is possible, doesn't mean there is much sense in doing it.
Astronuc
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Nov18-12, 09:32 AM
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Quote Quote by Squall94 View Post
Is it possible to make an alloy with all possible stable (non-radioactive) metals? I've googled around, and I couldn't find one, and also couldn't find a reason why it hasn't been made. If its not possible, what is the reason behind it?
It would be possible, but impractical.

In most (if not all) alloy systems, some metals are considered impurities to be limited to ppm or less.

It is impractical because metals have widely different properties related to their electronic structure. Metals have widely varying physical properties, e.g., density, melting/boiling points, strength, etc. Liquid metals would be of little use in high strength alloys.

Squall94
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Nov18-12, 09:34 AM
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An alloy of all stable metals


It was mentioned that not all metals are miscible. What is the reason behind this? I read somewhere that in the liquid state they mix, but seperate upon being cooled. What causes this? Is it from the density of the metals?
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Nov18-12, 11:58 AM
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Quote Quote by Squall94 View Post
It was mentioned that not all metals are miscible. What is the reason behind this? I read somewhere that in the liquid state they mix, but seperate upon being cooled. What causes this? Is it from the density of the metals?
It is dependent on the electron configuration. The density depends on atomic radius and atomic mass.

http://www.webelements.com/periodicity/atomic_radius/

Elements that do not readily mix can be mixed under special conditions followed by rapid solidification. In general, such processes are proprietary or trade secret.

There are now sophisticated software tools, e.g., CALPHAD, that allow the development and understanding of various compounds and alloys.


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