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-40 to 70C Degrees Special Refrigerator

  1. Feb 21, 2017 #1
    Hi all,

    I'm trying to find a special refrigeration device that can goes from -40 Degrees to 70 degrees. I need this machine for a laboratory to test sensors in differente temperatures.

    Does anyone knows where can I find something like that?

    Kind Regards
    Vicente
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 21, 2017 #2

    lewando

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    What is your budget? What volume of air do you want to temperature control? I assume you mean degrees C.
     
  4. Feb 21, 2017 #3

    Nidum

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    @ervays

    In this and in your previous thread your questions are just too vague to answer properly .

    Please tell us exactly what you are trying to do .
     
  5. Feb 21, 2017 #4
    Budget is not a real problem, the cheaper the better but this is for a laboratory. I'm just gonna make a budget.

    About the space, you are right I didn't mention it. I want to have a inner space about 50 cm H,W,D.

    I just want to place a vacuum chamber inside the incubator.

    Cheers
     
  6. Feb 21, 2017 #5

    Bandit127

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    Does the same device need to do both -40 and +70? I think it would be cheaper and easier if you could have a refrigerator and an incubator next to each other.
     
  7. Feb 22, 2017 #6
    Yes, it should. Cause it is for the study of the behaviour of the sensors when the temperature changes. But some device from 0 to 60 could work. Minus degrees is the ideal device.

    This is all about a name I can start looking with. I've found on some websites a lab equipment called incubator. But all the options I've found are really small. I'm looking for something similar but with a bigger chamber.

    Thanks all for the replys!
     
  8. Mar 15, 2017 #7
    Can you have any kind of heat transfer, hot or cold, in a vacuum??
     
  9. Mar 15, 2017 #8

    OmCheeto

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    Radiant?
     
  10. Mar 15, 2017 #9

    berkeman

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    We use Sun ovens in our Lab at my work, and we've been happy with the ovens and Sun's customer service:

    http://www.sunelectronics.com/

    If you can live with a low temperature limit of -30C, you can use their refrigeration-based chambers:

    http://www.sunelectronics.com/Temperature-Chamber-Refrigeration-Model.html

    If you really need -40C, you will likely need liquid CO2 based cooling:

    http://www.sunelectronics.com/Temperature-Chamber-EC1X-Model.html
     
  11. Mar 17, 2017 #10
    You're going to make me do an experiment to find out aren't you.. Im not sure Radiant Transfer will work since there is nothing in a vacuum for the radiant source to act upon... Im new here, but I'm liking this site a whole bunch... It makes me think.. The more you know, the more you'll realize you don't know...
     
  12. Mar 17, 2017 #11

    OmCheeto

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    If radiant heat transfer doesn't work in a vacuum, please come up with an independent theory which explains how the sun warms the earth. :doh: :oldwink:

    This is why many of us roll our eyes at newbies who show up and complain that the Forum won't allow them to share their very independent theories. Regular physics is hard enough to comprehend, even without the distractions of alt-physics.
     
  13. Mar 17, 2017 #12

    berkeman

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    I'd assume that they would have something in the vacuum that they want to heat, so the radiant energy would need to be absorbed by that object (preferably some dark colored object)...
     
  14. Mar 20, 2017 #13
    Not all the technology we have today is here because inventors followed the rules of physics, it is here because inventors were not afraid to step outside the box.. I agree that regular physics is challenging to learn and can be even more challenging to master.. So then you will be content to learn the psychical science as it is taught and never challenge your mind to go beyond ?? I would hope not..

    So in answer to your question; have you studied the properties of Light, Electromagnetic Radiation as it is knowm?? "https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Light" gives a pretty good basic explaination, it has a psychical property to it.. Remember also that light is not the only source of heat and cold is merely the absence of heat..
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2017
  15. Mar 20, 2017 #14

    DrClaude

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    No invention ever broke the laws of physics. And to think outside the box, you first need to know where the edges of the box are.

    In any case, PhysicsForums is not the place for this. We are mostly there to help students (formal and informal) to learn.

    Psychical???

    I'm quite sure that @OmCheeto, as well as the others who have replied to the OP, know that quite well.
     
  16. Mar 21, 2017 #15

    mfb

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    Climate chamber / environmental chamber are keywords to look for. The large size is more problematic than the temperature range. If your device is inside a vacuum chamber anyway, there could be cheaper ways to achieve a stable temperature.
    Examples found with a quick google search: One, two, three, four - there are certainly more options. Those things are expensive, and your budget won't be infinite.
     
  17. Mar 21, 2017 #16

    russ_watters

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    In addition to what @mfb said, another key word to try is "stability chamber". A quick google finds one capable of -20 to +200C. You might be able to do better.

    Also, you could just make some minor modifications to a standard ULT(-85C) freezer to add warming capability. With the freezer function shut off, it is just a well-insulated box. Add a little heater and temperature controller and now it's a warm environmental chamber.

    And if money is really not an object (people say it, but it isn't true), you could probably get a manufacturer to custom make you a chamber to suit your needs.
     
  18. Mar 21, 2017 #17

    Dale

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    That is so true.

    A colleague's girlfriend came to our lab one day and asked us to help her pick out a computer for her lab. Her boss had told her that money was no object. In 10 minutes we had identified a great computer for her boss.

    The next day she came back with a target budget.
     
  19. Mar 21, 2017 #18

    russ_watters

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    Oh, that sounds like fun! Like the way I fantasize about the observatory I'll build myself when I win the lottery or sell my company (note to self: start a company) for a billion dollars!
     
  20. Mar 22, 2017 #19

    mfb

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    "What? My lab computer controlling a few power supplies totally needs 30 GB of RAM!"
    You shouldn't spend time wondering if you can get some random resistor in your $1 million experiment a dollar cheaper, but a climate chamber can easily be in the 5-digit range, and if you can save $10,000 you will always make someone happy.
     
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