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50 Hz vs 60 Hz and frequency changer

  1. Oct 3, 2007 #1
    Is it not correct that electronic devices in the US are typically 60 Hz, and 50 in Europe? Is so, I wonder about one thing; when talking about "normal" electronic appliances that you would have in your house, I always believed that something made for 60 Hz wouldn't work at all if you were on a 50 Hz grid. My company often installs pumps with frequency changers built in. These pumps apparently have their speed regulated by this frequency changer. Would it also then be true that an appliance or whatever made for 60 Hz would just run "slower" if it was to be connected to a 50 Hz grid??
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 3, 2007 #2
    It depends on what type of "appliance" you are using.
    If it is just an electric motor or pump it will simply run slower with more torque, but if there is an ac/ac drive you have to control if your converter is suitable for both frequency. Anyway, if you look at the data sheets you'll find the answwer
     
  4. Oct 3, 2007 #3

    berkeman

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    Also, the AC mains voltage is generally different between the US and Europe, and that is the more important reason that US (120Vrms @ 60Hz) and European (220Vrms @ 50Hz) devices may not work in the other location. It is possible to make universal switching power supplies that work across both frequency and input voltage ranges, however, and that is becoming more common for small appliances and devices (like laptop computer supplies).
     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2007
  5. Oct 4, 2007 #4
    220Vrms @ 50Hz
     
  6. Oct 4, 2007 #5

    berkeman

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    Oops, thanks for the typo fix!
     
  7. Oct 4, 2007 #6
    If the motor made for 60Hz and used in 50Hz line, there might have some issues:
    1. Assume the motor runs directly from line and has no converter. It takes 0.02sec to complete one cycle (one spin) for 50Hz line, and about 0.0166sec for 60Hz line. This means about 0.0034sec slower per spin.
    2. If the motor has a converter or uses lower voltage than line (220vac or 115vac), it will denpend on how good the converter is. It will be OK if the converter has a good enough regulator. Otherwise, the motor will be slower tha expected.
     
  8. Oct 5, 2007 #7
    The company I used to work for made instruments for sale in both the US and Europe. We built, and rated, everything for 115/230 VAC, 50/60Hz. Modern electronics can be built that way without any difficulty at all. Devices such as transformers or motors may not be built for multi-voltage, multi-frequency use.
     
  9. Oct 5, 2007 #8

    berkeman

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    Some transformers have multiple-tap inputs, to accommodate different input voltages (120Vrms and 230Vrms, for example).
     
  10. May 31, 2009 #9
    I have a wii prower supply with the following specifications: 240V and 50hz and I will move to a country that has a network of: 240V and 60hz. I would like to know what are the consequences if I connect directy this power supply in the power network.
    Thank you.
     
  11. May 31, 2009 #10

    mgb_phys

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    It will work perfectly well, simple switched mode power supplies don't care about frequency.
    Just out of interest are there any countries that use 240V/60Hz?
     
  12. May 31, 2009 #11
    Phillipines is a country with a network 240V/60Hz

    by the way, thank you
     
  13. Jun 1, 2009 #12

    russ_watters

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    usa...?
     
  14. Jun 1, 2009 #13
    Phillipines is a country with a network 240V/60Hz
     
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