A question to Electrical Engineers

  • Thread starter dejan
  • Start date
  • #26
chroot
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
10,226
36
Well, CyberSoda, I'm a little unsure of what degree you are pursuing. The truth is that very few (if any) BSEE degrees are broken down into specialties like the ones you listed. It seems you are pursuing a BSEET (Electrical Engineering Technologist), am I right?

If so, my advice for you, seriously, is to avoid the BSEET altogether and get a real 4-year BSEE degree.

- Warren
 
  • #27
7
0
Hi Chroot, these degrees are 4 year degree programs that are offered by UCF (University of Central Florida) http://www.catalog.sdes.ucf.edu/current/degree_programs/ [Broken]
Any particular reason as to why you do not recommend the BSEET track?
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #28
7
0
I've been leaning towards microelectronics.
 
  • #29
chroot
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
10,226
36
EET degrees are generally regarded, at best, as "an inch deep and a mile wide." At worst, they're viewed as glorified associate's degrees for people who want to be engineers, but aren't good with math. This will be a hindrance.

I'm not saying you're not smart, or that you aren't good at math -- but an EET degree will cast that light on you. Be careful.

- Warren
 
  • #30
chroot
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
10,226
36
Also, note that three BSEE programs offered are so similar (only a couple of upper-division classes are different) that there's no point in trying to decide one versus the other until you're pretty far along.

- Warren
 
  • #31
7
0
Thanks a million!
 
  • #32
ranger
Gold Member
1,676
1
Does someone who has a BSEET and is a PE, still regarded in the way as you stated, chroot?
 
  • #33
chroot
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
10,226
36
It depends on the specific field, ranger. If you want a design position, you need theoretical training, and a BSEET is not going to cut it. Also, no one really cares about the PE cert for design work -- at least not for microelectronics or communications, the fields I work in.

Other areas, like power systems design, etc., may provide excellent opportunities for BSEET/PE people, but I don't have any experience in those areas.

- Warren
 
  • #34
At worst, they're viewed as glorified associate's degrees for people who want to be engineers, but aren't good with math.
- Warren

Can you elaborate on this?

I know that at one technical college where I live(not mentioning names), they have an 4 year EE program that focuses on the theoretical more than the application (not having to take many labs, and not having to take the labs at specific times). and at another technical college, they have a 4 year EET program that focuses a lot more on the application (every non-elective class requires a passing lab in addition to passing the class). This is the way they were described to me. And I know both require the same amount of math classes. Maybe most 2 year EET schools aren't like this, but if anything, I'd think the labs would provide for more mathematical practice.
 
  • #35
chroot
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
10,226
36
Labs don't provide mathematical practice.. they're.. labs. They provide hands-on experience with oscilloscopes, soldering, wiring up circuits, etc. The amount of math you're going to do in an undergrad EE lab is essentially nil.

Theory classes -- and their homework assignments -- are what provide mathematical practice.

And if you look at the UCF curricula listed here, you'll see that the EET is missing a handful of math classes that I would consider critical for a person working at the level of a BSEE.

- Warren
 
  • #36
Well it's true that an EET will at best be getting coffee for an EE, but I think some EET schools are closer than others on learning what EEs learn. There's also a tad more involved than soldering, oscilloscopes, and hooking up circuits in the lab (design, yes digital, analog, and massive projects). And the salaries are getting closer as well in large cities.

So while it's true that the stereotype exists, let's not snub our technologist buddies, they're helpful at times (especially when you need coffee)
 
  • #37
russ_watters
Mentor
20,590
7,259
The truth is that very few (if any) BSEE degrees are broken down into specialties like the ones you listed.
Ehh, a lot of engineering programs are, but the thing is that it is really meaningless. Out of 30-40 engineering courses, you may get 2 or 3 electives that can count for a concentration (that's the way it was for MEs at Drexel, anyway). And what is the point of that? In reality, people coming out of such programs with different concentrations aren't any different.
 
  • #38
russ_watters
Mentor
20,590
7,259
Does someone who has a BSEET and is a PE, still regarded in the way as you stated, chroot?
For engineers in general, the PE is important for stamping drawings for things like permits, so it is pretty job specific. If you have a job where that is important, the PE is everything. If you have a job where you don't ever use it, the PE is completely worthless.
 
  • #39
458
0
what is PE? sorry never heard of this acronym...
 
  • #40
russ_watters
Mentor
20,590
7,259
Professional Engineer. It is a government (state) certification.
 

Related Threads on A question to Electrical Engineers

  • Last Post
Replies
7
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
16
Views
7K
Replies
4
Views
27K
Replies
8
Views
5K
Replies
1
Views
875
  • Last Post
Replies
7
Views
2K
Replies
2
Views
11K
Top