Americans are all raccoons!

  • Thread starter Rach3
  • Start date
  • #51
Skyhunter
Well, habaneros range from 200,000 to 300,00 Scoville units, and our red Caribbeans are high on that scale. Although we grow them to process into sauces, etc to cook with, we also use those peppers "neat" in certain foods, like sauteed meat and vegetable fillings to use in wraps. I like the heat, and though the hot taste is great when you're used to them, they will make your scalp sweat, and that's not something you can control. If you feel a cold coming on, put some habanero sauce in your soup, sandwich, whatever, and ride it out. Great stuff. We eat our jalapenos split lengthwise with all the placenta and seeds left in, stuffed with cream cheese and topped with Monterey jack, cooked on the grill on a pizza pan. It doesn't matter how many I make (within reason) - there are no left-overs. Tabasco is not much hotter than our home-made tomato salsas, and we use those on eggs, omelets, meat, casseroles, sandwiches, etc.

My favorite chili (pepper is a misnomer) is manzano. (12,000 - 30,000) I like to eat them on toast spread with avocado, with red onions and tomato in season. The peppers are from the back yard (still on the vine, gotta love the climate here) and the rest, except perhaps the avocado, comes from the local farmers market.
 
  • #52
23
0
I was raised Catholic... in a large Catholic family. Therefore am still plagued with guilt if I leave food on my plate.
Is that a Catholic thing?
 
  • #53
61
2
I think it is more of a large family thing
I am from a catholic family too and I have no trouble leaving food for "mr manners"
 
  • #55
turbo
Gold Member
3,147
53
Is that a Catholic thing?
If you're from a large family and your parents grew up during the depression, you take modest portions of food, and perhaps have seconds once you have finished that. You don't leave food on your plate - left-overs go to the fridge for later. Wasting food is a cardinal sin to people raised in such situations.
 
  • #56
486
1
Yeah, I never understood why my grandfather ran his finger around the inside of the eggshell to get every last drop until we got up to the 1930's in history and my teacher told me...

Back to some earlier posts, raise your hand if you know what a real cucumber tastes like (rather than a mouthful of bitter slimey seeds)... Dude, I miss ripe produce instead of the pretty gassed stuff they sell us in the States.
 
  • #57
FredGarvin
Science Advisor
5,067
10
In CA there are shops called Trader Joes, only place I have every bought food in America, they have decent produce, at a *fair* price
I have shopped there for a lot of years. They are both in NY and MI as well.
 
  • #58
FredGarvin
Science Advisor
5,067
10
Back to some earlier posts, raise your hand if you know what a real cucumber tastes like (rather than a mouthful of bitter slimey seeds)... Dude, I miss ripe produce instead of the pretty gassed stuff they sell us in the States.
I don't know where you are, but things like cukes and beans and a lot of other produce people grow in their backyards. It is not difficult to get real fresh produce.
 
  • #59
486
1
Used to have a backyard... best green beans and wax beans I ever tasted!
 
  • #60
Rach3
Used to have a backyard... best green beans and wax beans I ever tasted!

I myself never tasted wax.
 
  • #61
turbo
Gold Member
3,147
53
Yeah, I never understood why my grandfather ran his finger around the inside of the eggshell to get every last drop until we got up to the 1930's in history and my teacher told me...

Back to some earlier posts, raise your hand if you know what a real cucumber tastes like (rather than a mouthful of bitter slimey seeds)... Dude, I miss ripe produce instead of the pretty gassed stuff they sell us in the States.
Hand raised! We always had a garden when I was growing up and I worked it about every day when I was a kid. We grew tart crisp pickling cucumbers (not the big straight 8s) so we could preserve them and eat them all year long. For the last 20 years or so, my wife and I lived in a development so that I could be close to work and I truly missed the garden. Now, we live in a cozy log cabin on 10 acres, and we have a good garden spot that I am amending with manure, peat, compost and organic fertilizer. Our crop this year (despite horrible weather) was very good and our freezers are full. I miss the fresh produce from the garden, but the produce from the freezer (mostly blanched and fast-frozen) is superior to much of the "fresh" stuff in the stores, and we don't have to reach into our wallets every time we want Swiss chard, green beans, etc. I also froze over 20 gallons of blackberries, and we have strawberries, blueberries, etc frozen. It's great to haul some of these out of the freezer, feed them to the juicer and drink them, sometimes with a little seltzer. :biggrin:
 
  • #62
23
0
Yeah, I never understood why my grandfather ran his finger around the inside of the eggshell to get every last drop until we got up to the 1930's in history and my teacher told me...
It's worst with some holocaust survivors. A lot of them are obsessed with food, but some collect all sorts of stuff. After http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Solomon" [Broken] I was collecting used toys and garments with the rest of the kids in the Kibbutz for Ethiopian immigrants. In one of the houses we entered there were rooms filled with all sorts of containers. The old guy who lived there never threw anything out, there were stacks and stacks of food containers - mostly useless disposable dairy product packs. We took as much as we could carry and threw it in the rubbish when we were out of sight.

Back to some earlier posts, raise your hand if you know what a real cucumber tastes like (rather than a mouthful of bitter slimey seeds)... Dude, I miss ripe produce instead of the pretty gassed stuff they sell us in the States.
My girlfriend works in an http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthroposophy" [Broken]. I've attended two lunches there, and must confess I loved everything I ate.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #63
486
1
My girlfriend works in an http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthroposophy" [Broken]. I've attended two lunches there, and must confess I loved everything I ate.

Ha! And people say Americans are spoiled?? Yonoz, I was reminiscing about the cheap, typical cucumbers that are everywhere you turn in Israel!
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #64
23
0
Ha! And people say Americans are spoiled?? Yonoz, I was reminiscing about the cheap, typical cucumbers that are everywhere you turn in Israel!
Yes, those are usually known as Lebanese cucumbers. The more you water them, the larger they grow. The smaller ones are tastier (the skin is gives most of the flavour, I believe), and whenever I'm overseas I notice the cucumbers, as well as other fruit and vegetables, are much bigger - perhaps it's due to the farmers wanting to get more vegetable mass per area, or ill-informed consumer preferences.
I suppose it could be the relative scarcity of water here that is responsible for better tasting vegetables and fruit. Much of the agriculture here, especially in the south, uses ground water with medium salt content which is unfit for drinking but makes for great tasting tomatoes, watermelons and cantelopes. :!!)
 
  • #65
202
0
My point is not that I'm incapable of finding edible food in this city (I'm alive, aren't I?); it's that this anti-cuisine of grease permeates the culture so thoroughly, that it takes significant effort to avoid it. I mean come on, since when do fruit drinks contain 58g of high-fructose corn syrup? (Please don't answer that.)

Sometimes you'll find a travel agent in the supermarket. (hint)
 
  • #66
Evo
Mentor
23,539
3,175
Used to have a backyard... best green beans and wax beans I ever tasted!

I myself never tasted wax.

I've never been fond of wax fruits or vegetables, my mother always kept a bowl of wax fruit on the coffee table. :frown:
 
  • #67
ShawnD
Science Advisor
668
1
I also froze over 20 gallons of blackberries, and we have strawberries, blueberries, etc frozen.

My dad does this and I have no idea why. Berries turn into mush when you thaw them. They still taste the same but they have a texture like that of baby food.
 
  • #68
turbo
Gold Member
3,147
53
My dad does this and I have no idea why. Berries turn into mush when you thaw them. They still taste the same but they have a texture like that of baby food.
They are wonderful in pancakes and muffins (they mush when you cook them, too) and since we pick wild berries, they are very flavorful and they make great fruit juice. My wife and I have a commercial-grade juicer, and juice the berries regularly. In fact instead of a sandwich, chile, etc for lunch today, I had a big glass of blackberry/blueberry/strawberry juice. Another good reason (and my parents grew up in the depression, so this was a way of life) is that wild berries are free - you just have to invest the time to pick them and freeze them. I have done this since I was a little kid, and we always had berries in our freezer. Check the price of a pint of blackberries in the supermarket, then multiply that by 8 to get the price of a gallon. That's the amount that I can pick on my property in about 3 hours (every other day or so). They have a lot richer flavor than cultivated berries, with no chemicals and no fertilizers, and they are frozen when they are absolutely ripe and fresh, so the flavors and nutrients are preserved.
 
  • #69
Astronuc
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
19,964
3,498
I've never been fond of wax fruits or vegetables, my mother always kept a bowl of wax fruit on the coffee table. :frown:
:rofl: My grandmother did the same. I always wondered why. :rolleyes:
 
  • #70
143
0
America is the greatest country ever! Most people hate America because they have it tough or they are jealous.
 
  • #71
Astronuc
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
19,964
3,498
My dad does this and I have no idea why. Berries turn into mush when you thaw them. They still taste the same but they have a texture like that of baby food.
Berry season goes from May until July, maybe into August in the NE US, although some berry bushes may have shorter seasons. During berry season, we pick fresh berries for pancakes, or serial, or eat them right of the bush. But if we want berries in the winter time, i.e. out of season, we have to freeze them like turbo mentioned.

Now interestingly, I was talking to a friend's sister who lives on perhaps the largest berry farm in NZ. She mentioned that they discovered that if their raspberries are cooled to winter conditions, e.g. they get snowed on, and then experience a warm period, the berries will flower and bear fruit, i.e. a second harvest! This is news to me. I don't know if it is feasible where I live, but I'd love to try it. Our berry season is basically the summer. On the other hand, NZ is looking really attractive now - with ocean, beaches, mountains, and a nice little cottage and orchard in an alpine. valley. :tongue2:
 
  • #72
turbo
Gold Member
3,147
53
:rofl: My grandmother did the same. I always wondered why. :rolleyes:
If you think back to when fruit was not always available locally except in season, it might have seemed quite an extravagance to have a bowl brimming with fruit on your table. Wax fruit probably seemed like a bit of opulence to people who had lived through the Depression and had experienced times of want. My grandmother kept real fruits and berries around, in a time when such things were so expensive that you bought them one orange at a time, one grapefruit at a time. The food in today's produce departments may not be the tastiest or the freshest, but 45-50 years ago, it would have shocked you to see such variety at the grocer's.
 
  • #73
turbo
Gold Member
3,147
53
Berry season goes from May until July, maybe into August in the NE US, although some berry bushes may have shorter seasons. During berry season, we pick fresh berries for pancakes, or serial, or eat them right of the bush. But if we want berries in the winter time, i.e. out of season, we have to freeze them like turbo mentioned.
Berries start with strawberries in about June followed by blueberries and raspberries (they overlap), during which time the blackberries start ripening - and the wild blackberries here last right into late September, early October. They are cheap healthy food, and we freeze them because other methods (making preserves, ect) involve using extra sugar, pectin, jars, etc. It we want berries for cereal, we go to the freezer, open a big zip-lock bag of berries and crumble them into a bowl. We freeze them dry and they don't harden into a block. The blackberries are a bit soft when they thaw, but are not mushy like they had been cooked, and they are great on cereal.
 
  • #74
Astronuc
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
19,964
3,498
Berries start with strawberries in about June followed by blueberries and raspberries (they overlap), during which time the blackberries start ripening - and the wild blackberries here last right into late September, early October. They are cheap healthy food, and we freeze them because other methods (making preserves, ect) involve using extra sugar, pectin, jars, etc. It we want berries for cereal, we go to the freezer, open a big zip-lock bag of berries and crumble them into a bowl. We freeze them dry and they don't harden into a block. The blackberries are a bit soft when they thaw, but are not mushy like they had been cooked, and they are great on cereal.
IIRC, my strawberries came in during the later part of May. Down in the Carolinas, I think they are available by April. My blackberries were gone by September. I lost 7 canes to a deer :mad: so I surrounded the blackberries with mesh and was able to salvage a decent amount - but then a rabbit found a way in and got a bunch of berries. The rabbit then started to hang out in the raspberry patch (but he'd leave when the dog was around). I'll be re-doing the beds in the spring to make them more secure.
 
  • #75
Moonbear
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
11,558
53
It's worst with some holocaust survivors. A lot of them are obsessed with food, but some collect all sorts of stuff. After http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Solomon" [Broken] I was collecting used toys and garments with the rest of the kids in the Kibbutz for Ethiopian immigrants. In one of the houses we entered there were rooms filled with all sorts of containers. The old guy who lived there never threw anything out, there were stacks and stacks of food containers - mostly useless disposable dairy product packs. We took as much as we could carry and threw it in the rubbish when we were out of sight.

I actually think this hoarding behavior is more a symptom of age-related neural problems. We attribute it to those who survived the depression or holocaust mainly because they are the people who are a large part of the elderly population right now. I've seen this across quite a spectrum of elderly though. What's impressive is that in most cases I've seen, they are incredibly organized about it. Stacks and stacks of saved newspapers in one corner, shelves of canned food they bought on sale (even if it's long outdated) all together, organized by type and brand, grocery bags all piled up together in another place, plastic food containers stacked up in another...and sometimes you see it with animal hoarding too...the elderly person who has 20 or 30 cats that have overrun their house, but they keep taking in more. It goes far beyond canning vegetables for winter or saving re-usable things.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Related Threads on Americans are all raccoons!

  • Last Post
4
Replies
83
Views
11K
  • Last Post
3
Replies
70
Views
7K
  • Last Post
2
Replies
39
Views
3K
Replies
97
Views
12K
Z
  • Last Post
Replies
15
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
22
Views
4K
Replies
56
Views
6K
Replies
44
Views
10K
Replies
13
Views
2K
Replies
20
Views
3K
Top