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Arthur C. Clarke died

  1. Mar 18, 2008 #1

    Ivan Seeking

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    http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601088&sid=axkmx6LQPGFQ&refer=home

    Clarke had an enormous influence on my teen years and early adult life. Farewell old friend.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 18, 2008 #2

    mgb_phys

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    I hadn't realised that what I quoted in another thread was from Clarke's three laws:

    "When a distinguished but elderly scientist states that something is possible, he is almost certainly right. When he states that something is impossible, he is very probably wrong."

    "The only way of discovering the limits of the possible is to venture a little way past them into the impossible."

    "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."

    The last of the Golden Age of SF .
     
  4. Mar 18, 2008 #3

    turbo

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    Farewell Arthur Clarke. He was a visionary.
     
  5. Mar 18, 2008 #4

    Evo

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    I loved his science fiction short stories. :frown:
     
  6. Mar 18, 2008 #5

    Astronuc

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    RIP AC. I enjoyed his stories, which fed my imagination.
     
  7. Mar 18, 2008 #6
    Kurt Vonnegut died recently too, and now Clark. This is too much.

    He was my hero and his books are one of my priced possessions. The man was the 20th century DaVinci.

    May he rest in the outer reaches of the cosmos.
     
  8. Mar 18, 2008 #7

    Ivan Seeking

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    Noteworthy: The Clarke Belt

    wiki
     
  9. Mar 18, 2008 #8
    Rip

    He was my favorite author. He could tell a story but you'd end up learning alot of science. His visions of the future were always optimistic and seemingly possible. I'd say he inspired many to pursue scientific careers.
     
  10. Mar 18, 2008 #9

    Garth

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    My favourite of his was the "The Sands of Mars".

    I am still waiting for reality to catch up with his imagination.

    Garth
     
  11. Mar 18, 2008 #10
    Isn't that more than enough to get banned from PF??
     
  12. Mar 18, 2008 #11

    mgb_phys

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    Sorry that went right past me!

    I quoted the first law in a thread about AIDS always being incurable, I though it was Bohr or Feynman who had said it - it was only reading the wiki article I realised it was Clarke.
     
  13. Mar 18, 2008 #12

    Janus

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    And so passes the last of the "Big Three".
     
  14. Mar 18, 2008 #13
    Clarke's goodbye to the world

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 25, 2014
  15. Mar 19, 2008 #14

    arildno

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    Dearly Missed

    Thank you for what you left behind for us, Mr. Clarke.
     
  16. Mar 19, 2008 #15
    I loved reading his books and short stories, what great skills he had. Thanks for adding the clip from YouTube, it was wonderful.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2008
  17. Mar 19, 2008 #16

    Ivan Seeking

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    Do you have any ACC's Mysterious Universe [aka Mysterious World] fans? He was quite the devotee of mysteries and the unexplained.

    Of his last three wishes he wanted, evidence of ET, and a solution to the energy problem [an option to oil], as numbers one and two on his list. That's my man!

    Thanks much for posting his farewell, waht.

    I bet that had he known what's going on in the field, he would be a huge fan of algae for fuel production. It's too bad that he didn't live long enough to see the field... bloom.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2008
  18. Mar 19, 2008 #17

    DaveC426913

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    I was wondering about this last night: who his peers were. I had not known about "The Big Three".

    Asimov was obvious, but the next one that came to mind for me was actually Bradbury rather than Heinlein, though he would have been fourth.
     
  19. Mar 19, 2008 #18
    The name sounds soo familiar, what did he do? Other than write stories as Evo said.
     
  20. Mar 19, 2008 #19

    He also called for world peace, and referred that we are becoming a "global family" now, due to advancement in communications. However he alluded to the fact that we are still divided, and should shed the tribal mentality. That was his third wish. Then concluded with a poem, a writer's poem.

    "If I have given you delight
    By aught that I have done,
    Let me lie quiet in that night
    Which shall be yours anon:
    And for that little, little span
    The dead are borne in mind
    Seek not to question other than
    The books I leave behind."
     
  21. Mar 19, 2008 #20

    OmCheeto

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    He wrote a story that made me believe in god: Childhoods End.

    It's a short story.

    I recommend it to every human on the planet.

    Godspeed professor Clark.

    Sorry I didn't get my warp drive developed in time to take you on a trip to Mars and back.
    I've day-dreamed about it over the last 40 years.
     
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