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Automotive Automotive Systems

  1. May 31, 2006 #1
    I don't know if this belongs in this forum or elsewhere, but i'll ask anyway...

    Anyone here knows a good book to read to learn on mechanical science (Applied to cars!)?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 31, 2006 #2

    Danger

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    I don't know of a specific book, but Car Craft and Hot Rod magazines feature tech articles and advice columns that can actually teach you a lot. Try to find some back issues, especially from the '70's and early '80's when it was more pure mechanics without all of the computer crap. They even give formulae for things like airflow through the engine or acceleration rates.
     
  4. May 31, 2006 #3

    brewnog

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    Milliken's Race Car Dynamics is the benchmark in terms of vehicle dynamics.

    Mechanical science is extremely broad, and is applied in some way or another to every single aspect of car design. If you want to be more specific, there are more specific references to be found.

    Robert Bosch's Automotive Handbook is an excellent all-rounder, and covers the fundamentals of most mechanical, electrical and hydaulic systems found on most modern cars, but lacks really in depth fundamental scientific explanation and theory.
     
  5. Jun 1, 2006 #4
    It`s exactly the scientific explanation and theory behind cars, such as how do suspensions work, or how does the airflow around a car... "flows".
     
  6. Jun 1, 2006 #5

    Danger

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    As Brewnog pointed out, there is no one science of automotive engineering. Suspension design involves things like spring rates, damping functions, material fatigue, hydraulics (for shock absorbers and 'active' suspensions), etc..
    Body design involves not only aesthetics, but also aerodynamics and ergonomics. Driveline components require knowledge of gearing, friction, material strength and so on.
    And that's just the tip of the iceberg.
     
  7. Jun 1, 2006 #6

    FredGarvin

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    We do have automotive engineering degrees now. I can't really tell you how different they are from regular ME courses though. I am assuming that the same overall class structure is followed but with applications from automotive applications only.
     
  8. Jun 1, 2006 #7

    brewnog

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    Our automotive engineering degrees are just mechanical engineering degrees with one or two extra automotive systems courses, and occasionally some sponsorship from a car manufacturer. Even the aerospace stuff is still in there, just turned upside down!
     
  9. Jun 1, 2006 #8

    FredGarvin

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    There ya go. I figured you would know that.
     
  10. Jun 1, 2006 #9

    Danger

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    Poor choice of words on my part. I didn't mean to imply that there's no science called automotive engineering; rather that there are many different types of science involved in it. Sorry for the confusion.
     
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