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Quantum Basic intro to QFT

  1. Oct 22, 2015 #1

    dyn

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    Hi. I'm just starting to self-study QFT and need all the help I can get. I already have "QFT for the Gifted Amateur" and the books by Zee and Schwartz . I am looking for another book that takes things step by step from the very basics. Was looking at the book "Student friendly QFT" by Klauber. I normally like books form lecturers/professors associated with recognizable universities so I know the info can be trusted but I don't know anything about this author. Does anyone have opinions on this book or any other book that might be suitable for me ?
    Thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 23, 2015 #2

    jtbell

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    Staff: Mentor

    Hover your cursor over the "Search" link at the top right corner of the page (or click the link), enter "Klauber", and make sure that the box is ticked that restricts searches to this forum. It appears that some people have mentioned Klauber's book favorably.
     
  4. Oct 24, 2015 #3

    vanhees71

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    Science Advisor
    2016 Award

    Well, I've some problems with

    http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0309679

    which was discussed in this forum. As long as such things don't appear in the book, I guess it can be trusted.

    The gifted-amateur book and Schwartz's are good. I don't like Zee. It tries to compress too much in too little space, and it is not very concise at some places, which leads to more confusion than it helps.

    Other very good books are the ones by Ryder and Bailin&Love (the latter concentrating on the path-integral approach using generating functionals in a very elegant way).
     
  5. Nov 13, 2015 #4

    haushofer

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    Zee is brilliant if you already know qft. Only then it is a fantastic read. Really different from his GR book, which is also good as introduction.
     
  6. Nov 14, 2015 #5

    BiGyElLoWhAt

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    Gold Member

    I am partial to QFT for the gifted amateur. It has some nice exercises, and explains things pretty well.
     
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