Becoming a scientist/physician

  • Thread starter BogMonkey
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In summary: One more thing, I've been told that in order to be a good doctor you also need to be knowledgeable in other fields, like pharmacology and biology. Do you think that's true?The material they cover in medical school must encompass some chemistry and pharmacology. I don't mean having a degree will help me get into medical school I mean I'll already have a lot of useful knowledge.In regards to medical school, it's the same in Slovenia (and as far as I know all across Europe), and I've heard of a lot of people who have multiple bachelors with one of them being medicine. So I guess if you want to combine that you'll have to go study medicine, but I bet the studies you're engaged
  • #1
BogMonkey
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I saw on a few documentaries people with titles like "Physician and biochemist" or "Physician and neuroscientist". I've been planning on becoming some kind of scientist but I won't be able to get government funding for all my projects so it would be nice to have a steady income like that of a physician. Is it hard to become both a doctor and a research scientist?
 
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  • #2
BogMonkey said:
I saw on a few documentaries people with titles like "Physician and biochemist" or "Physician and neuroscientist". I've been planning on becoming some kind of scientist but I won't be able to get government funding for all my projects so it would be nice to have a steady income like that of a physician. Is it hard to become both a doctor and a research scientist?

Depends on what you mean by "hard." Being admitted to medical school in general is extremely competitive. There are MD/PhD programs that specialize in training physcian/scientists. Many of these graduates go on to practice at an academic hospital where they can also run a research lab. I've known MD/PhD's who do 90% research, 10% patient contact and I've also known some who don't do any research. (And many in between...)

Ultimately I think it depends on what you want to do research. If you want to study in the basic sciences, like biochemistry, then you can certainly get a MD/PhD and earn a higher salary than someone who has only the PhD. However, you do have to put in the time. Most people who get a MD/PhD spend 7 years earning the degrees, and then spend between 3 and 7 years in medical residency, depending on the specialty.

Hope this helps!
 
  • #3
You might also want to keep in mind that a lot of MDs participate in and even direct research without the PhD. In general it ends up being clinically oriented research.
 
  • #4
Thanks a lot for the info. The course I'm in right now is a joint chemistry/pharmacology B.Sc course. In Ireland people go straight into medical school without doing a 4 year bachelor degree first so I'm not sure what I will have to do if I want to get an MD/PhD. I suppose the course I'm doing now can only benefit worst comes to worst I'll have to start medical school from scratch but by then I'll already have a good knowledge base in chemistry and pharmacology so I should tear through medical school.
 
  • #5
In regards to medical school, it's the same in Slovenia (and as far as I know all across Europe), and I've heard of a lot of people who have multiple bachelors with one of them being medicine. So I guess if you want to combine that you'll have to go study medicine, but I bet the studies you're engaged in now are going to be of significant help.
 
  • #6
BogMonkey said:
Thanks a lot for the info. The course I'm in right now is a joint chemistry/pharmacology B.Sc course. In Ireland people go straight into medical school without doing a 4 year bachelor degree first so I'm not sure what I will have to do if I want to get an MD/PhD. I suppose the course I'm doing now can only benefit worst comes to worst I'll have to start medical school from scratch but by then I'll already have a good knowledge base in chemistry and pharmacology so I should tear through medical school.

From what I've heard, having a degree in chemistry and pharmacology won't help you in medical school. Academic medicine also pays a fraction of what a non-academic physician makes.
 
  • #7
cdotter said:
From what I've heard, having a degree in chemistry and pharmacology won't help you in medical school. Academic medicine also pays a fraction of what a non-academic physician makes.

The material they cover in medical school must encompass some chemistry and pharmacology. I don't mean having a degree will help me get into medical school I mean I'll already have a lot of useful knowledge.
 
  • #8
Ryker said:
In regards to medical school, it's the same in Slovenia (and as far as I know all across Europe), and I've heard of a lot of people who have multiple bachelors with one of them being medicine. So I guess if you want to combine that you'll have to go study medicine, but I bet the studies you're engaged in now are going to be of significant help.
Thats pretty cool. Would multiple bachelors require 4 years for each degree or could you skip a year or two depending on the level of knowledge you already have? In my college the first year courses for lots of different courses (chemistry, genetics, biotechnology etc.) are identical so I assume if I wanted to get a second bachelors degree after I'm done with this one I could at least skip the first year.
 
  • #9
I'm pretty sure that if you were to transfer from Chemistry or Pharmacology to Medicine you wouldn't be able to skip a year or two, but could perhaps get some courses recognized as some of them do cover a similar topic. Since I'm not studying Medicine, it's hard to say what the number of such courses would be, but if I were to take an educated guess, I'd say no more than 5, probably only one or two. But even though you wouldn't get formal recognition, the stuff you'd learn would be helpful in understanding courses taught in Medicine. So you'd still have to go through 6 years of med school, but would at least have a somewhat easier time learning the stuff.
 
  • #10
Depending on where you do medical school, in all likelihood you wouldn't get to skip ANY classes. Not because you wouldn't know info, but because most schools want you to take everything there.

But some do let you skip courses, so let's talk about those...

Of the basic sciences, there is one Biochemistry course, and one pharmacology course. So if, you could skip those, that is only 2 classes. But, you likely wouldn't be able to skip pharmacology as the pharm in medical school is extremely specific to what you will need to know to be a doctor.

Hope this helps!
 

Related to Becoming a scientist/physician

1. What are the steps to becoming a scientist/physician?

The steps to becoming a scientist or physician vary depending on the specific field and career goals, but generally include obtaining a college degree in a related field, completing medical or graduate school, and gaining hands-on experience through internships or residencies.

2. What qualities are important for a successful career as a scientist/physician?

Some important qualities for a successful career as a scientist or physician include strong critical thinking skills, attention to detail, the ability to work well under pressure, and a passion for learning and discovery.

3. How long does it take to become a scientist/physician?

The time it takes to become a scientist or physician can vary greatly depending on the individual's educational path and career goals. On average, it can take anywhere from 8-12 years of education and training after high school to become a scientist or physician.

4. What are the job prospects for scientists/physicians?

The job prospects for scientists and physicians are generally very good, as there is a demand for these professionals in a wide range of industries and settings. However, competition for top positions can be fierce, so having a strong education and relevant experience can be beneficial.

5. What advice would you give to someone interested in becoming a scientist/physician?

My advice would be to start by exploring your interests and strengths in science and medicine, and then research different career paths and educational programs to find the best fit for you. It's also important to gain hands-on experience through internships or volunteer work, and to network with professionals in your field of interest. Lastly, never stop learning and stay open to new opportunities and challenges in your career.

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