Calculate power required to operate superconducting magnet

In summary, the conversation discusses the challenge of reducing power requirements for an electromagnet and the potential use of a superconducting magnet. However, due to the low resistance and amperes required, it is not viable in real life. The conversation also mentions the power requirements for usual MRI devices and the potential mechanical capabilities of a 7-9 Tesla electromagnet. The conversation ends with a question about how to calculate the power needed for a superconducting electromagnet capable of lifting 1 ton from 2 meters. It is noted that the power to run these magnets is determined by the power of the refrigerator, not the resistive losses in the magnet.
  • #1
losbellos
63
0
Dear Friends,

The great problem lies in here : I have calculated the power requirement of an electromagnet. That Its huge . To minimize this power requirement I would like to see if its possible with super conducting magnet, but I am having a problem, because the power requirement are so low, that it cannot be, and also the turns naturally not valid, Only the Resistance which is very low 1.0e-02x.

So having the resistance and the Amperes required using the P=U*I and I = U/R (remember its DC)
then the power would be very low, that the amperes are simply not possible in real life.
Against this I also happen to know the usual MRI devices uses 50-150 Amperes and some 20-50 volt. This makes some sense but in terms of power requirement still not.

A 7-9 Tesla electromagnet have incredible mechanical capabilities as well.

So, say I would like to have a magnet which can lift 1 tons from 2 meter.

Anybody can help how to calculate this out with superconducting electromagnets?
 
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  • #2
The power to run these magnets is determined by the power of the refrigerator, not the resistive losses in the magnet.
 
  • #3
thx I look into it.
 

Related to Calculate power required to operate superconducting magnet

1. How is power calculated for a superconducting magnet?

The power required to operate a superconducting magnet can be calculated using the formula P=IV, where P is power, I is current, and V is voltage. The current and voltage values can be obtained from the specifications of the magnet, and the power will be in watts.

2. What factors affect the power required for a superconducting magnet?

The power required for a superconducting magnet is affected by factors such as the magnetic field strength, the size and shape of the magnet, and the ambient temperature. Higher magnetic field strength and larger magnet size will require more power to operate, while operating at colder temperatures can reduce the power requirements.

3. How do I determine the appropriate power supply for a superconducting magnet?

The appropriate power supply for a superconducting magnet can be determined by considering the power requirements calculated using the P=IV formula. It is important to choose a power supply with a sufficient voltage and current capacity to meet the requirements of the magnet. Consult with the manufacturer or a specialist for specific recommendations.

4. Can the power requirements for a superconducting magnet be reduced?

Yes, the power requirements for a superconducting magnet can be reduced by operating the magnet at lower temperatures. This is because superconducting materials have zero electrical resistance at low temperatures, meaning that once a current is established, it can flow indefinitely without requiring additional power to maintain the magnetic field.

5. What are the consequences of not providing enough power to a superconducting magnet?

If a superconducting magnet does not receive enough power, it will not be able to generate the desired magnetic field strength. This can result in compromised experimental results or failure to achieve the desired outcome. In some cases, insufficient power can also cause the magnet to quench, which can damage the magnet and require costly repairs. It is important to ensure that the power supply is adequate for the operation of the magnet.

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